Definition

Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in the colon or the rectum. Colon and rectal cancers arise from the same type of cell and have many similarities. It is for this reason they are often referred to collectively as “colorectal cancer”. The cells lining the colon or rectum can sometimes become abnormal and divide rapidly. These cells can form benign (non-cancerous) tumours or growths called polyps. Although not all polyps will develop into colorectal cancer, colorectal cancer almost always develops from a polyp. Over a period of many years, a polyp’s cells may undergo a series of DNA changes that cause them to become malignant (cancerous). At first, these cancer cells are contained on the surface of a polyp, but can grow into the wall of the colon or rectum where they can gain access to blood and lymph vessels. Once this happens, the cancer can spread to lymph nodes and other organs, such as the liver or lungs—this process is called metastasis, and tumours found in distant organs are called metastases.

Polyps larger than one centimeter, with extensive villous patterns, have an increased risk of developing into cancer. The vast majority of colorectal cancers are adenocarcinomas, tumours that arise from the mucosa cells of the colon.

Did You Know…

  1. Symptoms of colorectal cancer can be mistaken for other ailments. Please click on the Section entitled “Symptoms” to learn how you can distinguish between colorectal cancer and other harmless conditions.
  2. Patients with Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. To learn more, visit our “Risk Factors” Section.

Risk Factors

Experts are not completely sure why colorectal cancer develops in some people and not others. However, several risk factors have been identified over the years. Risk factors for colorectal cancer can be divided into two main groups: those that you cannot change and those that are lifestyle-related and, therefore, subject to change.

Risk Factors You Cannot Change:

  • Age: The risk of developing colorectal cancer increases with age. The disease is more common in people over the age of 50, and the chance of developing colorectal cancer increases with each decade. However, colorectal cancer has also been known to develop in younger people as well. (Patel, 2009: Gairdiello, 2008)
  • Type II Diabetes
  • Personal History of Colorectal Polyps/Cancer
  • Personal History of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
  • Family History of Colorectal Cancer or Adenomatous Polyps
  • Inherited Syndromes: Genetic syndromes passed through generations of one’s family can increase one’s risk of developing colorectal cancer.
  • Racial & Ethnic Background: African Americans and Jews of Eastern European descent (Ashkenazi Jews) are two groups most affected by colorectal cancer.
  • Personal History of Other Cancers

Lifestyle-Related Risk Factors That Can Be Altered:

  • Diet
  • Sedentary Lifestyle/Physical Inactivity
  • Obesity
  • Alcohol Consumption

Did You Know….

  1. Being physically inactive is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. A simple walk around the block can help boost your activity level.
  2. Colorectal Cancer Canada is part of a global effort, the Never Too Young Program, dedicated to the increasing number of patients under the age of 50 being diagnosed with colorectal cancer.
  3. Low intake of fruits, vegetables and fibre can increase your risk of developing colorectal cancer. Add colorful vegetables and fruits to your diet.

Symptoms

Many people with colorectal cancer experience no symptoms in the early stages of the disease. When symptoms appear they will likely vary depending on the cancer’s size and location in the large intestine, also known as the colorectum. Studies suggest that the average duration of symptoms (from onset to diagnosis) is 14 weeks. There is no association between overall duration of symptoms and the stage of the tumor. Therefore, it is best to get regular screenings rather than rely on colorectal cancer symptoms to alert one to the presence of a tumor. This is because colorectal cancer can grow for years before causing any symptoms. But, knowing what to look out for most certainly cannot hurt. Typical symptoms resulting from colorectal cancer are:

  • Constipation/Diarrhea
  • Narrow Stools
  • Abdominal Cramps
  • Bloody Stools
  • Unexplained Weight Loss/Loss of Appetite
  • Sense of Fullness
  • Nausea & Vomiting
  • Gas & Bloating
  • Fatigue/Lethargy

Did You Know…

  1. Colon cancer can be present for several years before symptoms develop. Screening is critical.
  2. The left side of the colon is narrower than the right colon. Therefore, cancers of the left colon are more likely to cause partial or complete bowel obstruction. This can cause symptoms of constipation, narrowed stool, diarrhea, abdominal pains, cramps, and bloating.

ask your questions

Diagnosis

Diagnosing colorectal cancer starts with a visit to your family doctor who will review your symptoms, conduct a physical exam and possibly order blood tests. If results suggest that colorectal cancer might be present, your doctor may recommend one or more additional tests for an official diagnosis. A Flexible Sigmoidoscopy or a Colonoscopy are common diagnostic tests that allow your doctor to remove tissue and perform a biopsy to confirm the presence of cancer. If colorectal cancer is detected, you may need further tests to find out the position and size of the cancer, as well as determine the extent of your cancer. These tests may include blood tests and image tests such as an Ultrasound or CT scan.


Staging

Staging of colorectal cancer refers to how far a cancer has spread on a scale from 0 to IV, with 0 meaning a cancer that has not begun to invade the colon wall and IV describing cancer that has spread beyond the original site to other parts of the body. Staging describes the extent of the cancer based on:

  1. how many layers of the bowel wall are affected,
  2. whether lymph nodes are involved, and
  3. if there it has spread to other organs.

For colorectal cancer, staging often can’t be completed until after surgery to remove the primary tumour along with surrounding tissue (containing lymph nodes), and possibly lesions found on other organs.

Below is generally how the cancer is referred to between doctor and patient:

  1. The cancer is confined to the innermost layer of the colon or rectum. It has not yet invaded the bowel wall. Is also referred to as high grade dysplasia
  2. The cancer has penetrated some or several layers of the colon or rectum wall.
  3. The cancer has penetrated the entire wall of the colon or rectum and may extend into nearby tissue(s).
  4. The cancer has spread to the lymph nodes.
  5. The cancer has spread to distant organs, usually the liver or lungs.

Did You Know…

  1. Staging of your colorectal cancer is an important indication of the type of treatment you may receive.
  2. The size of your colorectal tumour doesn’t influence the outcome.
Aider à diffuser le message que le cancer colorectal est

PRÉVENU, TRAITÉ et COMBATTU!

Colorectal Cancer Canada est un organisme national sans but lucratif composé de bénévoles, de membres et de membres de la direction dirigés par un conseil d’administration. Un comité consultatif médical composé de professionnels de la santé de haut niveau dans le domaine du cancer colorectal fournit des conseils à la CCC pour veiller à ce que ses membres soient tenus au courant des dernières avancées médicales en matière de diagnostic et de traitement de la maladie. Le mandat de Colorectal Cancer Canada est simple : sensibilisation, soutien et défense des intérêts.

Sensibilisation

La CCC organise une grande variété d'activités de sensibilisation et d'éducation tout au long de l'année afin d'accroître la visibilité du cancer colorectal au Canada et d'éduquer le public. Nous participons à des forums et à des conférences sur la santé, distribuons du matériel éducatif, organisons des séances d'information gratuites et produisons des messages d'intérêt public pour la télévision, la radio et l'imprimerie.

En savoir plus

Soutien

En tant qu’organisme oeuvrant aux mieux être des personnes atteintes, la CCC comprend bien les besoins des gens qui ont reçu un diagnostic de cancer colorectal et de leur famille. Ceux ci peuvent trouver information, compassion et compréhension au sein des groupes de soutien mis sur pied dans toutes les régions du pays et chargés d’assurer la liaison entre les personnes atteintes, les survivants et les dispensateurs de soins.

En savoir plus

Défense-Action

La CCC s’emploie à faire connaître aux décideurs clés les principaux sujets de préoccupation liés à la prévention et au traitement du cancer colorectal au Canada, à savoir : l’instauration dans tout le pays du dépistage du cancer colorectal et d’un accès à des traitements efficaces pour les personnes atteintes.

En savoir plus

Prévention

La plupart des décès par cancer colorectal pourraient être évités si toutes les personnes âgées de 50 ans et plus subissaient des tests de dépistage réguliers.

Who We Are

On July 1, 2017, Colon Cancer Canada and the Colorectal Association of Canada joined forces to become Colorectal Cancer Canada (CCC) and is now Canada’s sole patient association dedicated to improving the quality of life of patients, increasing awareness and educating the public about prevention and treatment of Canada’s second biggest cancer killer for men and women combined.


Our Mission

Colorectal Cancer Canada is the country’s leading colorectal cancer not for profit patient organization, dedicated to colorectal cancer awareness and education, supporting patients and their families and advocating on their behalf.


Our Vision

We envision a world where early screening and detection results in 100% survival for colorectal cancer.

CCC_2e Diagnostiqué Cancer Canada HOR@2x

CCC_2e Cause décès Femmes@2x
CCC_2e Cause décès Hommes@2x

CCC_26 décès chaque jour@2x
CCC_73 Diagnostiqué chaque jour@2x

CCC_14900 diagnostiqués Femmes@2x
CCC_14900 diagnostiqués Hommes@2x

CCC_26800 Diagnostiqué - 9400 Décès@2x
CCC_2nd Diagnosed Cancer Canada HORCCC_

CCC_2nd Cause Death WomenCCC_
CCC_2nd Cause Death WenCCC_

CCC_26 Die Every DayCCC_
CCC_73 Diagnosed Every DayCCC_

CCC_11900 Diagnosed WomenCCC_
CCC_14900 Diagnosed MenCCC_

CCC_26800 Diagnosed - 9400 DieCCC_



17 document(s) trouvés


How The Colon and Rectum Function

This document provides a short description on the anatomy of the colon andrectum


More on Diagnosing Colorectal Cancer

More details on the types of tests used in diagnosing colorectal cancer is supplied here


More on Risk Factors

More details on each of the risk factors is supplied in this document


More on Staging of Colorectal Cancer

More information on the different stages of colorectal can be found here


More on Symptoms

More details on each of the symptoms is supplied in this document


A Guide to Understanding Ostomy

More details on ostomy; the types, the care is found here


A Guide to Understanding Colorectal Cancer Treatment Options

More details on the various treatment options is supplied here


About Clinical Trials

Learn more about what a clinical trial is and how it works


From Chemotherapuetic Agents to Biosmilars

Learn more about chemotherapeutic agents and biosimilars


Naturopathy as a Treatment Option

Learn More about the various treatment options in naturpathic medicine from prevention to recurrence


Side Effects of Colorectal Cancer Treatment

In depth detail of the side effects of various treatments


Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidelines in Canada

Learn more about screening guidelines in Canada


Diagnosis and Treatment Related Questions

Questions to consider asking your doctor related to diagnosis and treatment


Glossary of Terms

In depth glossary of terms related to colorectal cancer


Links to Provincial and Territorial Screening Programs

Links to Provincial and Territorial Screening Programs


Types of Screening Tests

Detailed description of screening tests available


Qu’est-ce que le cancer de l’anus?

Ce document donne une description du cancer de l’anus




17 document(s) found


How The Colon and Rectum Function

This document provides a short description on the anatomy of the colon andrectum


More on Diagnosing Colorectal Cancer

More details on the types of tests used in diagnosing colorectal cancer is supplied here


More on Risk Factors

More details on each of the risk factors is supplied in this document


More on Staging of Colorectal Cancer

More information on the different stages of colorectal can be found here


More on Symptoms

More details on each of the symptoms is supplied in this document


A Guide to Understanding Ostomy

More details on ostomy; the types, the care is found here


A Guide to Understanding Colorectal Cancer Treatment Options

More details on the various treatment options is supplied here


About Clinical Trials

Learn more about what a clinical trial is and how it works


From Chemotherapuetic Agents to Biosmilars

Learn more about chemotherapeutic agents and biosimilars


Naturopathy as a Treatment Option

Learn More about the various treatment options in naturpathic medicine from prevention to recurrence


Side Effects of Colorectal Cancer Treatment

In depth detail of the side effects of various treatments


Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidelines in Canada

Learn more about screening guidelines in Canada


Diagnosis and Treatment Related Questions

Questions to consider asking your doctor related to diagnosis and treatment


Glossary of Terms

In depth glossary of terms related to colorectal cancer


Links to Provincial and Territorial Screening Programs

Links to Provincial and Territorial Screening Programs


Types of Screening Tests

Detailed description of screening tests available


What is Anal Cancer?

This document provides a description on the anal cancer

Contactez-nous et nous vous reviendrons dès que possible. Nous avons hâte d'avoir de vos nouvelles!

  • Email
  • Phone
    1-877-50COLON (26566)
  • Fax
    514-875-7746 / 416-785-0450
  • Address
    1350 Sherbrooke Ouest
    Bureau 300
    Montreal, Qc, H3G 1J1
    ---
    4576 Yonge Street, Bureau 605
    North York, ON, M2N 6N4

Treatment Options

Different treatment options are available to patients depending on the size, location and stage of colorectal cancer.

Local therapies consist of surgery, radiation therapy and interventional radiology. These therapies can remove or destroy cancer in a particular area such as the colon, rectum, liver, lungs, peritoneum etc. without affecting other parts of the body.

Systemic therapies consist of chemotherapy and biological therapy whereby drugs enter the bloodstream and destroy or control cancer throughout the body.

Understanding your options in managing the disease is important which is why Colorectal Cancer Canada has developed a comprehensive guide to understanding colorectal cancer treatments. The treatments have been organized according to the following sections:

  • Surgical Therapies
  • Drug Therapies
  • Radiation Therapies
  • Interventional Radiology
  • Immunotherapy

The sections provide in depth information on therapies for all stages of colorectal cancer according to

  • Anatomical site
  • Treatment modality
  • Stage of disease

From Chemotherapeutic Agents to Biosimilars

Learn the difference between chemotherapeutic agents, small molecules, biologics, and biosimilars, all of which play a role in the management of colorectal cancer. They all kill colorectal cancer cells but how do they differ and at what point are they administered in a patient’s treatment plan?

Did You Know…

  1. Chemotherapeutic drugs affect "younger" tumors more effectively because mechanisms regulating cell growth are usually still preserved.
  2. Newer anticancer drugs act directly against abnormal proteins in cancer cells; this is termed targeted therapy and the drugs which commonly target cancer cells are called biologics.

Side Effects

The treatment of colorectal cancer may consist of one or a combination of the following: chemotherapy, biological or targeted therapy, radiation therapy, or surgery. These therapies are designed to kill or eradicate cancer cells throughout the body. Not surprisingly, these therapies may also damage normal, healthy cells that are not affected by the cancer which results in an adverse side effect of the treatment.

When cancer therapies cannot distinguish between cancer cells and normal, healthy cells, the result is an unwanted side effect.

Many side effects of treatment are normal and pose no danger to you other than a minor inconvenience, such as changes in fingernail growth. What is important to remember is that most side effects are merely temporary and will subside once the body adjusts to therapy or when therapy is completed.

Do not become discouraged about the side effects induced from colorectal cancer therapies, for remedies are readily available and symptoms short-lived.


Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are research studies designed to evaluate new cancer treatment options. They test the safety and effectiveness of treatments. Clinical trials evaluate:

  • A new anti-cancer drug
  • Unique approaches to surgery and radiation therapy
  • And new combinations of treatments

A drug being studied in a clinical trial is called an investigational drug. There are 4 phases to clinical trials and they answer the following questions:

  • Phase I: Is the treatment safe?
  • Phase II: Does the therapy work?
  • Phase III: Is the therapy better than what is currently available?
  • Phase IV: What else do we need to know?

It is important to note that all new cancer drugs that are currently available for the treatment of colorectal cancer, were only once available through clinical trials.

While the decision to enroll in a clinical trial of a novel cancer treatment is ultimately very personal, a clear understanding of the nature of clinical trials can help patients make the choice that is appropriate for them.

Did You Know…

  1. A clinical trial is performed only when there is good reason to believe that the treatment being studied may be better than the one currently used?
  2. All new cancer drugs currently available for the treatment of colorectal cancer were once only available through clinical trials?


To find a cancer trial in Canada visit canadiancancertrials.ca


Treatment Updates

Research has shown that patient education lowers uncertainty and the stress that comes with not knowing what to expect as a patient begins cancer treatment. Uncertainty is a known stressor that interferes with health, therefore, reducing it will improve the odds of successful cancer therapy. Preparation may also equip cancer patients and their caregivers with knowledge about good coping strategies, including how to cope with the fatigue that comes with treatment through adjusting work load and family life.

This is why Colorectal Cancer provides information on treatment updates in our comprehensive Library. These documents contain colorectal cancer treatment and clinical research updates across the continuum of care.

Most colorectal cancer treatment modalities are represented and up to date information is provided in a user-friendly language. The documents furnish information relating to:

  • Drugs & Systemic Therapies
  • Surgical Therapies
  • Radiation Therapies
  • Interventional Therapies
  • Screening
  • Psychosocial Oncology
  • Other
  • Nutrition & Healthy Lifestyle

To access up to date information on colorectal cancer, visit our library and select the Treatment Updates category.


Naturopathic Medicine and Colorectal Cancer

Prevention, especially in those who are at a higher risk for colorectal cancer, is the first and foremost important step in the fight against cancer. While there are many risk factors for colorectal cancer that cannot be modified such as age, family history of colorectal cancer, race, ethnicity and inherited syndromes, there are many things that can be done to help prevent the occurrence of cancer. Some of these include a healthy diet, regular physical activity, smoking cessation and limiting alcohol consumption.

Naturopathic medicine is an important part of Colorectal Cancer Care and offers therapies that:

  1. Reduce the risk of initially developing colorectal cancer
  2. Are supportive during chemotherapy, radiation and/or surgery and help to improve both the tolerance and success of conventional therapies
  3. Help prevent recurrence once cancer has been successfully treated.

Ostomy

Surgical removal of a malignant tumor is the most common treatment for colorectal cancer. The diseased portion of the colon and/or rectum is removed, and in most cases, the healthy portions are reattached (often referred to as anastomosis). Sometimes, that is not possible because of the extent of the disease or its location. In this case, a surgical opening is made through the abdomen to provide a new pathway for waste elimination. This is what is commonly referred to as an ostomy. The ostomy can be permanent, when an organ must be removed, or it can be temporary, when the organ needs time to heal.

For colorectal cancer, there are two types of ostomy:

  • Ileostomy (1) - the bottom of the small intestine (ileum) is attached to the stoma (opening). This bypasses the colon, rectum and anus.
  • Colostomy (2) - the left side of the colon is attached to the stoma. This bypasses the rectum and the anus.

A stoma (means opening) is a portion of your small or large intestine that has been brought through the surface of the abdomen (belly) which provides an alternative path for fecal waste to leave the body. A surgeon forms a stoma by bringing out a piece of bowel onto the abdomen and turns it back like a turtleneck and then sutures it to the abdominal wall. An ostomy flange and pouch with an adhesive backing is then attached over the stoma and worn on the abdomen to collect waste. It will require emptying throughout the day and completely changed at least once a week.

Did You Know…

  1. An ostomy need not be permanent. It may be reversed 9 months after your colorectal surgery. Speak with your colorectal surgical oncologist.
  2. People living with a permanent ostomy can lead a perfectly fulfilling and enriching life!

Since a percentage of the colorectal cancer population may require an ostomy, it is with this in mind that Colorectal Cancer Canada has developed a guide to helping patients understand the different types of ostomies and the care required to properly manage them.

This guide will help you better understand ostomies – what they are, why they are required, how they affect the normal digestive process, and what changes they can bring to a person’s life.

We're behind your behind

Colorectal Cancer is Preventable, Treatable and Beatable!

Get informed

In 2017, 1 in 13 men and 1 in 16 women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer.

Get the Facts

Support

You are not alone, we’re here to help.

Find a Cancer Coach

Advocacy

Though highly preventable and curable when detected early, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Canada.  We want to change this.

Here's How

Prevention

Most colorectal cancer deaths could be avoided if everyone aged 50 years and older underwent regular screening tests.

Renseignements généraux

Mettant en vedette une étonnante structure mesurant 12 mètres (40 pieds) de longueur sur 2,5 (8 pieds) mètres de hauteur, la Tournée du côlon géant est une exposition multimédia adaptée à tous les âges. On y présente les maladies qui touchent le côlon humain, notamment le cancer colorectal. L’exposition du côlon géant a vu le jour en mars 2009, pendant le Mois national de la sensibilisation au cancer colorectal, et s’arrête régulièrement dans toutes les régions du pays.

L’exposition est animée par le Dr Preventino, professeur invité de CCC. Apparaissant sur cinq écrans vidéo, le Dr Preventino guide les visiteurs à l’intérieur du côlon géant et leur donne des conseils sur les saines habitudes de vie et sur la façon d’assurer la santé de leur côlon.


Louer le côlon géant

Cancer colorectal Canada (CCC) est heureux d’offrir aux organismes de partout au Canada l’occasion unique d’informer le public au sujet du cancer colorectal et des autres maladies touchant le côlon humain en leur permettant d’inviter la Tournée du côlon géant dans leur région.

Pour présenter la Tournée du côlon géant, n’hésitez pas à communiquer avec nous en composant le numéro sans frais 1-877-50-COLON (26566), poste 2529 ou en nous écrivant à l’adresse giantcolontour@colorectalcancercanada.com

Pas de doute. Nous sommes plus forts ensemble!

CCC offre une vaste gamme de projets de bénévolat auxquels vous pouvez participer :

  • Développement (en participant à des événements de collecte de fonds organisés partout au Canada)
  • Groupes de soutien (en offrant du soutien au sein d’un groupe existant ou en mettant sur pied un nouveau groupe au sein d’une communauté non desservie)
  • Défense des intérêts (en appuyant notre campagne visant à mettre en œuvre une politique de dépistage nationale et en améliorant l’accès aux traitements les plus récents)
  • Contribution aux projets administratifs au bureau de Montréal
  • Participation en tant que bénévole à la Tournée du côlon géant lorsqu’elle passe par votre région

Cancer colorectal Canada organise divers événements de collecte de fonds tout au long de l’année afin de sensibiliser le public aux principaux enjeux et appuyer les objectifs de l’organisme. CCC dépend de la générosité de ses donateurs et de ses commanditaires afin de mettre en œuvre ses projets.


Journée tout en bleu

Le premier vendredi de mars est la Journée tout en bleu, une campagne qui vise à sensibiliser le public pendant le Mois national de la sensibilisation au cancer colorectal et qui fait partie d’un mouvement international visant à atteindre des milliers de familles touchées par la maladie.

Les gens s’habillent en bleu pour démontrer leur soutien et amasser des fonds pour la maladie.


Gala annuel

Chaque année, Cancer colorectal Canada (CCC) organise un important gala de bienfaisance qui célèbre le travail remarquable de l’organisation. Cet événement nous permet de mettre en œuvre des programmes qui contribuent à sauver des vies et qui aident les patients partout au pays.

L’événement de cette année aura lieu le jeudi 22 mars 2018 et offrira un plaisir pour les sens. Du spectacle qu’offre le Salon 1861 au rythme de la musique en direct, en passant par les arômes de notre marché aux épices, l’événement ne ressemblera à aucun autre. L’événement commencera par un cocktail d’honneur, qui sera suivi d’une dégustation de mets et de vins organisée par des restaurants locaux. Les plats seront accompagnés de vins millésimés réputés qui contribueront à offrir une expérience culinaire mémorable.

Joignez-vous à nous pour faire de ce huitième gala annuel une soirée qui saura ravir nos convives.

Pour de plus amples renseignements sur l’événement et les possibilités de commandites, veuillez cliquer ici.


« Push For Your Tush »

Organisé chaque année, l’événement « Push For Your Tush » est une journée familiale et amusante qui permet de rendre hommage aux survivants et qui offre l’occasion de se souvenir et d’honorer les êtres chers qui nous ont quittés.

Activité de sensibilisation au cancer colorectal la plus importante au Canada, « Push For Your Tush » est un événement de marche et de course national qui se déroule au sein de 11 communautés et qui a permis d’amasser plus de 5,4 millions de dollars jusqu’à maintenant. Les fonds amassés contribuent à soutenir la recherche, l’éducation, la sensibilisation et les soins aux patients.

Pour plus de renseignements, veuillez communiquer avec Cathie Jackson


« Bum Run »

La « Bum Run » est un événement unique de course et de marche de 5 kilomètres qui se déroule au centre-ville de Toronto le dernier dimanche d’avril. Créé par le Dr Ian Bookman, un gastroentérologue de Toronto, cet événement a pour but de sensibiliser le public au fait que le dépistage du cancer colorectal peut prévenir 95 % des décès attribuables à cette maladie.

Tous les fonds amassés par les participants contribuent directement aux programmes de sensibilisation et de soutien aux patients de CCC.

Joignez-vous à nous lors de notre prochaine « BUM RUN » afin de pouvoir vous aussi apporter votre contribution.


Tournoi de golf « Kick Ass »

Le tournoi de golf « Kick Ass » aura lieu le 12 juillet 2018 au club de golf Lebovic, à Aurora, en Ontario.


Décembarbe

RELEVEZ LE DÉFI DÉCEMBARBE!

Pendant le mois de décembre, faites-vous commanditer pour vous faire pousser la barbe. Si vous avez déjà une belle barbe fournie, pourquoi ne pas la décorer et, qui sait, vous transformer en arbre de Noël humain?

Seuls ou en équipe, les hommes et les femmes peuvent participer à ce défi! Vous ne pouvez pas vous faire pousser la barbe? Vous pouvez simplement enfiler une fausse barbe ou vous en dessiner une. Nous sommes impatients de voir ce que vous préparerez!

L’argent que vous aidez à amasser contribue à financer les programmes éducatifs et de soutien de Cancer colorectal Canada.

Défense des intérêts 101

La défense des intérêts consiste à raconter votre histoire à un décideur par divers moyens, dans le but précis d’inciter cette personne à faire (ou ne pas faire) quelque chose. Il s’agit habituellement d’un processus qui prend du temps avant d’entraîner des résultats concrets, et il n’existe pas de manière unique de défendre les intérêts.

La défense des intérêts se fonde également sur deux éléments essentiels :

  • Votre capacité à raconter votre histoire — cela se fait selon votre propre style et votre propre niveau d’aisance.
  • L’établissement et la création de relations mutuellement avantageuses avec des personnes qui ont le pouvoir d’apporter des changements.

Enfin, la défense des intérêts représente une prise en main personnelle — à savoir la capacité d’exercer une forme de contrôle ou de prendre certaines mesures quant à l’enjeu qui vous tient à cœur.


Créer un plan de défense des intérêts efficace

Bien qu’il soit possible de créer soi-même son plan de défense des intérêts, l’organisme qui représente la cause (p. ex., Cancer colorectal Canada) a souvent déjà pris le temps de développer une stratégie de défense des intérêts composée des trois volets suivants, auxquels les gens peuvent participer.

  • Étape 1 — Détermination du message principal : décidez des enjeux que vous voulez défendre, puis créez les messages principaux correspondants afin d’appuyer votre point de vue. Cette étape consiste à recueillir une grande variété de renseignements et à les résumer de la manière la plus simple possible.
  • Étape 2 — Outils de défense des intérêts : ensuite, décidez des moyens par lesquels vos principaux messages parviendront aux décideurs. Ce sont vos outils de communications, qui sont au centre de tout plan efficace de défense des intérêts. Tout moyen permettant aux gens de communiquer entre eux est un outil potentiel.
  • Voici des exemples d’outils qui peuvent vous aider à défendre vos intérêts :
  • Site Web
  • Infolettre
  • Rencontre en personne
  • Appel téléphonique
  • Lettre, télécopie ou courriel
  • Pétition
  • Campagne de cartes postales
  • Brochure
  • Fiche d’information
  • Journée de défense des intérêts
  • Séance d’information
  • Défense des intérêts en ligne
  • Étape 3 – Votre revendication : Il s’agit de l’objectif de tout plan de défense des intérêts, à savoir d’être capable de demander à un décideur la chose que vous voulez qu’il accomplisse, et non une liste des choses que vous attendez de lui. Votre revendication doit être concrète, elle doit pouvoir être mesurée. Demander son soutien à quelqu’un est comparable à une promesse vide; cela ne mènera jamais vraiment à rien à moins d’expliquer exactement au décideur ce que vous voulez qu’il accomplisse pour manifester son soutien aux enjeux que vous défendez.

Rencontrer les décideurs

Pour commencer, vous devrez peut-être déterminer qui est votre député fédéral ou provincial. L’enjeu que vous défendez déterminera la personne que vous devrez rencontrer. Pour ce qui est des soins de santé, il s’agira probablement de votre député provincial. Dans ce cas, vous pouvez trouver votre député provincial sur Internet.

Parmi tous les outils à votre disposition pour vous aider dans vos efforts de défense des intérêts, une rencontre en personne avec un décideur représente l’un des plus efficaces (dans le cas du gouvernement, un représentant élu ou un fonctionnaire). Rien ne remplace vraiment le fait de se retrouver face à face avec le décideur. Lorsque les messages principaux sont présentés de façon claire, convaincante et cohérente, cela peut contribuer fortement à établir une bonne relation de travail et à faire aboutir votre revendication. Toutefois, le vrai secret du succès lorsqu’il est question de défense des intérêts est de ne jamais abandonner. Par conséquent, multipliez les rencontres et les communications avec votre représentant élu jusqu’à ce que vous obteniez ce que vous voulez.


Développer et raconter votre histoire

Pendant que vous vous préparez à défendre vos intérêts, prenez le temps de créer votre histoire. Rédigez-la si vous le pouvez, ou demandez à quelqu’un de vous aider à la mettre sur papier. Que vous soyez un survivant du cancer, un aidant, un membre de la famille ou un ami, votre histoire est unique et aborde de façon personnelle les enjeux et les défis que vous avez rencontrés. Assurez-vous de bien saisir ces réflexions et ces sentiments. Il s’agit d’un élément fondamental de vos activités de défense des intérêts.

Que vous rencontriez un décideur en personne ou que vous lui écriviez une lettre, vous devriez toujours prendre le temps de lui raconter votre histoire ou votre expérience. C’est ce qui vous permettra d’attirer l’attention de votre auditeur et d’humaniser les enjeux que vous défendez.

Pour en apprendre davantage au sujet de la rédaction de votre histoire, veuillez consulter le document intitulé Raconter votre histoire : un guide de rédaction..


Défense des intérêts et médias

Le partage de votre histoire dans les médias — journaux, radio, télévision et Internet — peut être une excellente façon de revendiquer un changement ou la prise de mesures à l’égard d’un enjeu en particulier. Lorsqu’il est question de défense des intérêts, il est important de garder à l’esprit que la possibilité de parler aux médias de façon proactive ne devrait être envisagée qu’après avoir discuté avec votre représentant élu et lui avoir donné la possibilité de vous aider. L’utilisation des médias permet à votre enjeu de passer de la sphère privée à la sphère publique, et cela peut vous permettre d’atteindre un public plus large et ainsi aller chercher davantage de soutien. Il peut s’agir d’un excellent moyen de faire pression auprès du gouvernement, qui se soucie beaucoup de l’opinion des électeurs.

Pour cette raison, l’utilisation des médias dans un effort de défense des intérêts est une démarche sérieuse qui ne devrait être envisagée qu’après avoir épuisé tous les autres moyens à votre disposition et avoir consulté Cancer colorectal Canada. Nous sommes là pour vous aider!


Médias sociaux et défense des intérêts

Les médias sociaux font partie intégrante du quotidien de nombreuses personnes et, tout comme les médias traditionnels (presse parlée et écrite), ils représentent un puissant outil de défense des intérêts. Les médias sociaux comme Facebook, Twitter et YouTube peuvent vous aider à mieux faire connaître l’enjeu que vous défendez auprès d’un groupe élargi de personnes.

Sous leur forme la plus simple, les médias sociaux facilitent la découverte, la lecture et le partage de nouvelles et de renseignements. L’utilisation des médias sociaux pour mieux faire connaître l’enjeu que vous défendez permet en tout temps aux gens de discuter avec vous et de commenter les renseignements que vous partagez, par des moyens que les médias traditionnels ne permettent pas. En outre, les représentants élus prêtent attention aux renseignements partagés sur les médias sociaux, surtout sur Twitter; toutefois, il est important d’utiliser ces outils de façon judicieuse et au bon moment.

En tant que patient, aidant, membre de la famille ou ami d’une personne atteinte d’un cancer colorectal, vous avez ainsi, plus que jamais, la possibilité de vous exprimer et de communiquer ce que vous avez à dire à un grand nombre de personnes. Plus le nombre de vos contacts ou de personnes qui vous suivent sur les médias sociaux est élevé, plus vous êtes susceptible de faire entendre votre voix et d’atteindre les bonnes personnes.

Commencez par nous suivre sur Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn and contact us Facebook, Twitter, Instagram et LinkedIn et communiquez avec nous si vous avez des questions au sujet de l’utilisation des médias sociaux dans la défense des intérêts.

Efforts continus

Bien que nous ayons accompli beaucoup de choses au fil des années, il n’en demeure pas moins que le cancer colorectal (CCR), même s’il peut être prévenu, arrive toujours au deuxième rang des principales causes de mortalité par cancer au Canada. De plus, nous devons faire face à de nouveaux défis, comme la hausse des cas de CCR chez les jeunes adultes, et nous tenir au courant des avancées en recherche et développement.

Nos diverses initiatives nous permettent de continuer à défendre les intérêts et le bien-être des patients atteints d’un CCR et des personnes à risque de développer cette maladie :

  • Le programme « Les aliments contre le cancer » permet aux Canadiens d’intégrer des choix alimentaires sains, nutritifs et amusants à leur régime alimentaire quotidien. Ce programme offre aux Canadiens des recettes qui les aideront à faire les bons choix alimentaires, dans le but de prévenir le cancer colorectal ainsi que d’autres cancers. Les propriétés anticancéreuses que renferment les recettes ont également l’avantage d’augmenter les chances de survie au cancer à long terme.
  • Le projet de considération des valeurs des patients dans l’évaluation des technologies de la santé santé permettra à Cancer colorectal Canada et à d’autres groupes de patients atteints de cancer au Canada et à l’étranger de mieux comprendre le point de vue des patients lorsqu’un médicament anticancéreux est examiné par une autorité d’évaluation des technologies de la santé (ETS). Le projet vise à définir, mesurer et considérer les valeurs et les préférences des patients, puis à intégrer ces valeurs ou ces préférences à la présentation du groupe de patients soumise à l’ETS.
  • Le Modèle d’accession aux essais cliniques sur le cancer par les groupes de patients est une initiative de Cancer colorectal Canada (CCC) qui vise à augmenter le recrutement, la participation et les taux de rétention pour les essais cliniques sur le cancer au Canada. Une rencontre de concertation et une réunion de groupe de travail ont été organisées par CCC en 2017, ce qui a mené à la formulation de recommandations stratégiques visant à augmenter la participation aux essais cliniques. Ces recommandations devraient être publiées dans la revue Current Oncology en 2018.
  • Les données concrètes constituent le troisième volet de notre initiative nationale « trilogique » axée sur les patients. Ce volet met l’accent sur la capacité de recueillir des données issues des essais cliniques afin de mettre au jour les meilleures avenues de traitement pour les patients dans la pratique clinique. CCC consacrera une conférence aux données concrètes qui lui permettra de continuer à recueillir le point de vue des patients tout au long de leur parcours thérapeutique contre le cancer colorectal.
  • La campagne « À chacun son traitement » vise à sensibiliser et à informer le public quant au besoin d’effectuer des tests génétiques dès qu’un patient reçoit un diagnostic de cancer colorectal de stade IV. La détermination du profil des biomarqueurs est importante dans la prise en charge adéquate de la maladie au stade avancé. Mais surtout, le fait de déterminer le profil génétique d’un patient assurera une approche personnalisée pour les soins et le traitement de sa maladie.
  • La campagne « Jamais trop jeune » contribue à sensibiliser et à informer le public au sujet du développement du cancer colorectal chez les jeunes. On observe en effet une hausse des cas de cancer colorectal chez les jeunes, et nous nous employons à recueillir davantage de renseignements à ce sujet et à soutenir ceux qui luttent actuellement contre la maladie.
  • Le programme de soutien aux patients Wendy Bear a été nommé à la mémoire de la femme de la légende du hockey Darryl Sittler, une militante de longue date de notre organisme de bienfaisance. Wendy a joué un rôle essentiel dans la sensibilisation et la collecte de fonds pour Cancer colorectal Canada avant son décès en 2002. Elle voulait s’assurer que chaque personne recevant un diagnostic de cancer colorectal bénéficierait du soutien nécessaire pour l’aider à vivre avec cette maladie. C’est en sa mémoire qu’a été créé l’ours Wendy (Wendy Bear); 100 % des recettes des ventes de l’ours contribuent directement à soutenir les patients en soins palliatifs qui en ont besoin.

Ce que nous avons fait jusqu’à maintenant

Depuis sa création, Cancer colorectal Canada a fait d’importants progrès dans l’amélioration de la vie des patients, la promotion du dépistage et l’accès aux options de traitement. Cancer colorectal Canada a organisé diverses conférences, tables rondes et réunions de concertation scientifiques. Les principaux guides d’opinion au Canada et à l’étranger se sont réunis pour formuler des déclarations consensuelles, et ils ont publié des lignes directrices de pratique afin d’améliorer les soins et la prise en charge des patients atteints d’un cancer colorectal. Par l’entremise de divers partenariats, de rencontres avec des décideurs fédéraux et provinciaux importants et de campagnes de publicité, de communication et de financement à l’échelle nationale, notre organisme a contribué aux réalisations suivantes :

  • Amélioration de la compréhension du cancer colorectal par les Canadiens
  • Réduction des délais d’approbation des médicaments par Santé Canada
  • Contribution à l’égalité en matière d’accès et d’approbation pour de nombreux traitements ciblés dans l’ensemble du Canada
  • Mise en place de programmes de dépistage du cancer colorectal dans les provinces et territoires
  • Rôle de premier plan dans la décision relative au remboursement des frais engagés pour des soins de santé à l’étranger
  • Mise en place de lignes directrices cliniques
  • Promotion de la réalisation d’essais cliniques pour de nombreux traitements comme la chimiothérapie par perfusion intra-artérielle hépatique (IAH), la chimiothérapie et la chimiothérapie hyperthermique intrapéritonéale (CHIP), et contribution à la formulation de lignes directrices nationales pour l’utilisation de la chirurgie à effraction minimale (CEM) dans la prise en charge du cancer du côlon
  • Publication d’une proposition de registres sur le cancer colorectal héréditaire au Canada, ce qui a permis à l’ensemble du pays de prendre conscience du besoin de mettre en place et de tenir à jour des registres sur le cancer colorectal héréditaire au Canada

Lutter pour une cause

Formé de patients atteints d’un cancer colorectal et d’aidants qui comprennent bien les besoins des malades et les difficultés à composer avec cette affection, Cancer colorectal Canada (CCC) est un organisme œuvrant au mieux-être des personnes atteintes de cette maladie. Par ses actions, l’organisme s’efforce de sensibiliser et d’informer le public au sujet du cancer colorectal, d’offrir du soutien aux patients et à leurs familles et de défendre leurs intérêts. CCC s’emploie également à défendre des enjeux nationaux et provinciaux plus généraux relatifs aux politiques de santé qui touchent tous les patients atteints de cancer, par exemple les valeurs et les préférences des patients dans l’évaluation des technologies de la santé, les essais cliniques sur le cancer et les données concrètes.

Les efforts de défense des intérêts de CCC visent trois objectifs principaux :

  • Faire la promotion de programmes communautaires de dépistage du cancer colorectal dans l’ensemble des provinces et des territoires
  • Prévenir le cancer en faisant la promotion de saines habitudes de vie
  • Assurer l’égalité d’accès, en temps opportun, à des traitements efficaces susceptibles d’améliorer les résultats chez les patients

Grâce à ces objectifs, nous croyons être en mesure de prévenir le cancer colorectal, de prolonger la vie des personnes touchées par cette maladie et de réduire la mortalité qui en découle


Pourquoi la défense des intérêts est-elle importante?

Il est important de s’employer à défendre les enjeux qui nous tiennent à cœur, car qui ne demande rien n’a rien. En outre, la défense des intérêts est également importante parce que l’autre possibilité, qui consiste à ne rien faire, n’est absolument pas envisageable. L’inaction n’a jamais entraîné de changements ou de progrès.

La défense des intérêts peut donner des résultats pour les raisons suivantes :

  • Les décideurs réagissent aux groupes ou aux personnes crédibles qui parviennent efficacement à mettre les enjeux qu’ils défendent à l’ordre du jour
  • Si ces décideurs sont des représentants du gouvernement, ils sont en présence d’intérêts et de préoccupations en concurrence, qui ne peuvent être distingués que lorsque les parties concernées se font entendre

En tant qu’électeurs et contribuables, nous avons tous la capacité de faire changer les choses.

Renseignements généraux

Le programme de soutien aux patients Wendy Bear a été nommé à la mémoire de la femme de la légende du hockey Darryl Sittler, une militante de longue date de notre organisme de bienfaisance. Wendy a joué un rôle essentiel dans la sensibilisation et la collecte de fonds pour Cancer colorectal Canada avant son décès en 2002. Elle voulait s’assurer que chaque personne recevant un diagnostic de cancer colorectal bénéficierait du soutien nécessaire pour l’aider à vivre avec cette maladie. C’est en sa mémoire qu’a été créé l’ours Wendy (Wendy Bear); 100 % des recettes des ventes de l’ours contribuent directement à soutenir les patients en soins palliatifs qui en ont besoin.


Admissibilité

Tous les patients atteints d’un cancer colorectal qui résident au Canada et qui éprouvent des difficultés financières en raison de la maladie sont admissibles à ce programme. Une aide financière est accordée en fonction de l’année civile aux patients qui sont considérés comme ayant des difficultés financières et qui satisfont aux lignes directrices de revenu admissible.

Les patients doivent fournir les documents suivants :

  1. Une copie de leur déclaration de revenus de l’année précédente
  2. La déclaration de revenus de l’année précédente de leur conjoint
  3. Une lettre attestant :
    • de la situation financière du patient, c’est-à-dire de toutes les autres sommes de soutien financier versées au patient, ou que le patient prévoit recevoir au cours de l’année civile en question
    • de tous les reçus correspondant à la demande

Les patients peuvent présenter une nouvelle demande de soutien aussi souvent que nécessaire, mais Cancer colorectal Canada se réserve le droit de refuser d’accorder des fonds supplémentaires à un patient si ces fonds supplémentaires entraînent un dépassement de la somme maximale de 1 500 $ par année civile allouée à chaque patient.

Chaque demande d’aide est examinée par le comité, qui tient compte du niveau de revenu, du nombre de personnes à charge du ménage et des frais médicaux et courants engagés dans la situation actuelle.

Des groupes d’information et de soutien sur le cancer colorectal existent maintenant dans plusieurs communautés à travers le Canada pour aider les patients et leurs aidants dans leur parcours avec le cancer. Des réunions mensuelles sont organisées, au cours desquelles des patients, des aidants et leurs familles partagent leurs expériences et offrent de l’aide et de l’information sur le cancer colorectal. Les réunions mensuelles se tiennent selon un modèle unique :

  1. Présentation des mises à jour concernant la recherche clinique portant sur les options de traitement les plus récentes :
    Ces mises à jour permettent aux patients de prendre des décisions plus éclairées concernant leurs plans de traitement et leur offrent la possibilité d’avoir des discussions approfondies avec leurs oncologues traitants.
  2. Étude du cas de chaque patient pour lui assurer un soutien optimal :
    On encourage les membres du groupe à parler de leur parcours, afin de pouvoir répondre à leurs préoccupations à l’égard des traitements ou des effets secondaires, de leurs craintes, de la nutrition, des soins de suivi après le traitement ou de tout autre sujet qu’ils souhaitent aborder.

Le saviez-vous?

  1. Au Canada, plus de deux millions de personnes participent maintenant à des groupes d’information et de soutien.
  2. Les personnes qui ont un soutien social sont en meilleure santé que celles qui n’en ont pas.

Voici certains des avantages rapportés par les patients qui ont fréquenté des groupes d’information et de soutien :

  • Ils en ont appris davantage sur le cancer
  • Ils en ont appris davantage sur les ressources offertes aux personnes atteintes de cancer
  • Ils ont eu le sentiment de redonner un sens à leur vie
  • Ils ont pu composer avec la maladie et les interventions médicales
  • Ils ont pu se faire une meilleure idée de la maladie
  • Ils ont pu mieux comprendre leurs besoins
  • Ils ont pu parler de leur cancer
  • Ils ont pu parler de leur cancer avec les membres de leur famille et leurs amis
  • Ils se sont sentis plus forts
  • Cela leur a permis de se sentir à la hauteur et mieux placés pour prendre des décisions
  • Ils se sont sentis moins isolés
  • Cela leur a permis d’être plus actifs, socialement et physiquement

Il y a un besoin croissant d’augmenter le nombre de groupes d’information et de soutien au Canada. Il y a actuellement 14 groupes en fonction un peu partout au Canada. Il y a toutefois 21 demandes de mise en œuvre de groupes d’information et de soutien de CCC formulées par des centres d’oncologie ou des centres de soutien. CCC s’emploie à former d’autres mentors et à créer de nouveaux groupes d’information et de soutien. Afin de pouvoir répondre à la demande croissante visant à fournir des soins de soutien et un accès à de l’information essentielle aux patients atteints d’un cancer colorectal et à leur famille, tout soutien financier est accueilli très favorablement.


“ Il n’y a pas assez de mots pour exprimer ce que le groupe d’information et de soutien de CCC a fait pour notre fille et notre famille. Nous assistons fidèlement aux rencontres mensuelles du groupe, au cours desquelles un mentor nous fournit une foule de renseignements sur les traitements et la maladie. Le seul fait de pouvoir discuter avec d’autres membres du groupe qui combattent la même maladie, reçoivent le même traitement et éprouvent les mêmes effets secondaires a grandement facilité notre parcours. Grâce à cette association extraordinaire et aux personnes courageuses qui assistent chaque mois aux réunions de soutien, nous avons vraiment l’impression qu’ensemble, nous pouvons faire face à n’importe quelle situation qui se présente. Nous encourageons tous les patients atteints d’un cancer colorectal à communiquer avec l’équipe du programme de mentorat de CCC. ”

La famille Gurreri


Vous trouverez ci-dessous une liste des groupes d’information et de soutien pour les personnes atteintes d’un cancer colorectal qui exercent leurs activités au Canada. Si vous souhaitez obtenir de plus amples renseignements à leur sujet, ou si vous ne trouvez pas de groupes dans votre communauté, n’hésitez pas à communiquer avec nous pour savoir si un groupe vient d’être mis sur pied dans votre ville ou si nous pouvons vous aider par l’entremise d’un mentor.

Ensemble, nous pouvons changer les choses!


COLORECTAL CANCER INFORMATION/SUPPORT GROUPS

Groupe de soutien du Centre de mieux-être Orchard Barn
3020, Erickson Road
Creston, C.-B.
Susan Snow
snowz@shaw.ca


Agence du cancer de la Colombie-Britannique Vancouver Centre
salle John Jambor, rez-de-chaussée, 600, 10e Avenue Ouest Vancouver, C.-B.
John Christopherson
jchristo@bccancer.bc.ca
604 877-6000, poste 2190


Wellspring Calgary
1404, Home Road
Calgary, Alberta
Trudy@wellspringcalgary.ca


Action cancer Manitoba
675, rue McDermot
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Michele Rice
204 787-4286


The Pallisades
100, rue Isabella
Ottawa, Ontario
Kim Anne DeChamplain Kim_anne.de_champlain@cspo.qc.ca


Réseau de ressources et d’action sur le cancer colorectal (Colorectal Cancer Resource & Action Network [CCRAN])
2545, Sixth Line (Trafalgar/Dundas)
Oakville, Ontario
Peter Hildyard
Peter.hildyard@gmail.com


Hearth Place Cancer Support Centre
86, rue Colborne Ouest
Oshawa, Ontario
Ted Trueman & Rosemary Donnelly
Contact Meredith Shaw, at Hearth Place: 905 579-4833 or
meredith@hearthplace.org

Hôpital général de North York
A cessé temporairement ses activités
Toronto, Ontario


Hôpital général de Toronto (ELLICSR)
A cessé temporairement ses activités
Toronto, Ontario


Wellspring Centre-ville
A cessé temporairement ses activités
Toronto, Ontario


Wellspring Westerkirk
A cessé temporairement ses activités
Toronto, Ontario


Wellspring Chinguacousy
A cessé temporairement ses activités
Brampton, Ontario


Centre L’espoir, c’est la vie
4635, chemin de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine Ouest
(au coin de la rue Lavoie)
Montréal, Quebec
Frank Pitman, membre du personnel de CCC
frankp@colorectalcancercanada.com
Veuillez confirmer votre présence auprès du centre L’espoir, c’est la vie au
514 340 3616
Conversation bilingue


Centre de bien-être de l’Ouest-de-l’Île pour personnes atteintes de cancer
489, boulevard Beaconsfield
Baie-D’Urfé, Quebec
Frank Pitman, membre du personnel de CCC
frankp@colorectalcancercanada.com
Conversation bilingue

Le programme de mentorat fait appel à des bénévoles dévoués vivant dans toutes les régions du Canada qui ont reçu une formation spéciale et une certification portant entre autres sur les traitements médicaux et chirurgicaux utilisés pour le cancer colorectal, l’adaptation psychosociale et la compréhension des rouages du système de santé. Les patients peuvent être orientés vers le mentor de leur région, qu’ils peuvent joindre par courriel ou téléphone, lorsqu’ils communiquent avec nous pour obtenir de l’information ou du soutien. Tous les mentors sont sous la direction de notre personnel qualifié et du comité consultatif médical.

Les mentors offrent du soutien et de l’information de multiples façons, notamment par téléphone, en ligne et lors de rencontres en personne si une demande précise est faite en ce sens. Les mentors mettent tout en œuvre pour s’assurer qu’une première réponse à une demande est fournie en moins de 24 heures. Tous les mentors sont supervisés à temps plein par notre directeur ou directrice de l’éducation afin de les aider à répondre aux questions. Le comité consultatif médical de CCC peut être consulté au besoin pour s’assurer que des renseignements de la plus haute qualité sont fournis.

Le programme de mentorat fait appel à des bénévoles dévoués vivant dans toutes les régions du Canada qui ont reçu une formation spéciale et une certification portant entre autres sur les traitements médicaux et chirurgicaux utilisés pour le cancer colorectal, l’adaptation psychosociale et la compréhension des rouages du système de santé. Les patients peuvent être orientés vers le mentor de leur région, qu’ils peuvent joindre par courriel ou téléphone, lorsqu’ils communiquent avec nous pour obtenir de l’information ou du soutien. Tous les mentors sont sous la direction de notre personnel qualifié et du comité consultatif médical.

Les mentors offrent du soutien et de l’information de multiples façons, notamment par téléphone, en ligne et lors de rencontres en personne si une demande précise est faite en ce sens. Les mentors mettent tout en œuvre pour s’assurer qu’une première réponse à une demande est fournie en moins de 24 heures. Tous les mentors sont supervisés à temps plein par notre directeur ou directrice de l’éducation afin de les aider à répondre aux questions. Le comité consultatif médical de CCC peut être consulté au besoin pour s’assurer que des renseignements de la plus haute qualité sont fournis.

Le saviez-vous ?

  1. Les patients qui ont un soutien social sont en meilleure santé que ceux qui n’en ont pas
  2. Les mentors peuvent fournir aux patients et aux aidants des renseignements sur les effets secondaires liés au traitement, les syndromes héréditaires, les tests et les registres, ainsi que sur l’accès aux nouveaux traitements et aux traitements en cours de mise au point

Les responsabilités d’un mentor sont les suivantes :

  • Répondre aux questions par téléphone, par courriel ou en personne
  • Remplir un Rapport du programme de mentorat (Cancer Coach Program Record, CCPR) pour chaque demande à des fins de tenue de registres centralisés
  • Être ouvert à l’idée de se joindre à une communauté de mentors partageant la même vision
  • Avoir la volonté de suivre une formation et d’acquérir des compétences dans l’écoute active, et de parfaire ses connaissances sur la prise en charge du cancer colorectal
  • Avoir la capacité de travailler en réseau avec d’autres personnes afin d’aller chercher les faits dont les patients ont besoin

Les mentors offrent aux patients et aux aidants des renseignements sur les sujets suivants :

  • Soutien psychosocial
  • Compréhension des rouages du système de santé
  • Traitement et prise en charge du cancer colorectal
  • Accès à de nouveaux traitements et à des traitements en cours de mise au points
  • Effets secondaires liés au traitement
  • Dépistage
  • Renseignements sur les syndromes héréditaires, les tests et les registres

CCC a mené des sondages auprès des patients et des aidants qui ont eu accès aux services des mentors au fil des ans. Nous leur avons demandé quels étaient, selon eux, les avantages qu’ils en avaient retirés, le cas échéant :

  • Ils en ont appris davantage sur leur cancer
  • Cela leur a permis de redonner un sens à leur vie
  • Ils ont pu se faire une meilleure idée de la maladie
  • Ils ont pu consulter des experts hautement qualifiés par l’entremise de deuxièmes avis médicaux et d’orientations
  • Ils ont pu mieux comprendre leurs besoins
  • Ils ont pu parler de leur cancer avec les membres de leur famille et leurs amis
  • Ils ont pu composer avec la maladie et les interventions médicales
  • Ils ont obtenu de meilleurs résultats en ayant accès à de nouveaux traitements
  • Cela leur a permis de se sentir à la hauteur et en pleine possession de leurs moyens

Grâce au programme de mentorat, bon nombre de patients ont pu avoir accès à de nouveaux traitements tant au Canada qu’à l’étranger pour traiter leur maladie.


“ Le programme de mentorat m’a sauvé la vie. Grâce aux renseignements qu’on m’a fournis, j’ai pu avoir accès à Avastin à Buffalo, puis j’ai pu subir l’opération au poumon dont j’avais tant besoin pour me guérir de mon cancer du côlon de stade IV. Huit ans plus tard, mon cancer n’a toujours pas réapparu grâce à CCC! Merci!! ”

Linda Wilkins, survivante d’un cancer de stade IV


Le fait de faciliter l’orientation en vue d’obtenir un deuxième avis médical a également permis aux patients d’obtenir de meilleurs résultats en modifiant leur plan de traitement.


“ Le soutien, les connaissances et les relations de ma mentore au sein de la communauté du cancer colorectal m’ont aidé à prendre des décisions éclairées et ont permis d’accélérer mon accès à un établissement reconnu mondialement et au meilleur traitement possible dans mon cas. Sa compassion, ses encouragements incessants, l’aide qu’elle m’a apportée pour comprendre les rouages du système de santé et sa volonté indéfectible de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires m’ont aidé à avoir accès à un traitement auquel je n’aurais pas eu accès si j’avais continué de me faire soigner à l’hôpital communautaire où mon parcours a commencé. Franchement, je ne sais pas où j’en serais aujourd’hui sans elle et CCC ”

Bob Mountford, patient atteint d’un cancer de stade IV


CCC continue de recevoir des commentaires positifs de la part des patients et des aidants qui ont pu tirer profit de l’aide offerte par le programme de mentorat. Voici certains des avantages du programme constatés par un grand nombre de personnes, comme l’ont souligné les mentors, les patients, les aidants et les membres du comité consultatif médical :

  • Le programme permet de réduire efficacement l’anxiété et la détresse, tout en favorisant l’impression d’avoir une emprise sur sa situation personnelle et en encourageant le sentiment d’acceptation et de paix
  • Il peut être adapté; ainsi, on peut y avoir recours à domicile et en petits groupes, ou sous la forme d’un enseignement individualisé ou de séminaires
  • Les patients et leurs familles qui vivent en régions rurales ou qui ne peuvent accéder physiquement au programme peuvent y participer par l’entremise de notre site Web, par courriel ou par téléphone
  • Le programme est durable en raison de son aspect pratique, et il convient aux familles et aux patients à toutes les étapes du parcours des patients atteints de cancer

CCC continue de faire la promotion du programme de mentorat directement auprès des patients. En outre, nos documents d’information destinés aux patients sont distribués dans la plupart des centres d’oncologie du pays. De nombreux centres d’oncologie font la promotion du programme auprès de leur population de patients, directement par l’entremise des bibliothèques d’information aux patients, par l’entremise de leurs oncologues, ou encore en remettant aux patients et aux aidants un dépliant sur le programme de soutien de CCC. Ces documents sont si populaires et si recherchés que CCC peine à répondre aux demandes.


“ Les avancées dans le traitement du cancer colorectal apportent beaucoup d’espoir à nos patients, mais également tout un lot de décisions et de sources de stress et d’anxiété supplémentaires. L’aide extraordinaire qu’apportent les mentors aux patients atteints d’un cancer colorectal en matière de soutien et d’orientation est tellement essentielle aux parcours de soins de nos patients que je considère nos mentors comme faisant partie intégrante du plan de traitement, au même titre que la chirurgie, la radiothérapie et la chimiothérapie! "

Dr. Calvin Law,
Chirurgien oncologue des voies hépatobiliaires
Directeur, Centre de cancérologie Odette
Centre des sciences de la santé Sunnybrook
Membre du comité consultatif médical de CCC


Recevez tous les renseignements et le soutien dont vous avez besoin, et apprenez-en davantage au sujet des soins et du traitement du cancer colorectal grâce à nos mentors attentionnés et compréhensifs. N’oubliez pas que le fait de poser des questions et de chercher à obtenir des réponses est un signe évident que vous vous en sortez bien! Ensemble, nous pouvons changer les choses.

Vivre avec le cancer est un défi. Vous seul pouvez déterminer quelle est la meilleure façon pour vous de faire face au cancer et aux traitements et comment gérer votre vie quotidienne. Vous vous sentirez mieux si vous participez activement à votre propre prise en charge.

En plus des aspects médicaux du cancer, vous aurez à faire face à différentes questions d’ordre émotionnel, psychologique et pratique. Vous devrez peut-être prendre des décisions que vous n’auriez pas eu à prendre autrement concernant vos priorités.

Cette section comprend des techniques qui peuvent vous aider à faire face à la maladie que plusieurs patients ont trouvées utiles, ainsi que des ressources afin de vous aider à trouver l’aide et l’information dont vous avez besoin.


Mettre les statistiques en perspective

Plusieurs statistiques publiées sont dépassées puisqu’elles sont basées sur des méthodes plus anciennes de traiter le cancer. De plus, les statistiques indiquent seulement la façon dont des groupes de patients répondent à une maladie précise ou à un traitement précis; elles ne peuvent pas prédire la réponse d’un individu en particulier. Vous voulez savoir quelles sont vos chances de guérir, mais il importe également d’éviter qu’une attitude positive puisse être copromise de façon négative par des statistiques qui n’ont rien à voir avec vous.

Afin de mieux faire face au cancer, concentrez toutes vos ressources mentales et émotionnelles de façon positive.


Faire face au traitement

Cela peut sembler difficile, mais il est préférable de reconnaître vos émotions, de vous défouler et d’exprimer ce que vous ressentez. Vous pouvez préférer parler à vos proches, à vos amis, à un membre de votre équipe de soins de santé ou à d’autres patients dans le cadre d’une rencontre d’un groupe de soutien. Une réunion d’un groupe de soutien ou groupe d’aide peut être un bon endroit pour parler avec des individus qui ont fait face à des problèmes similaires aux vôtres, pour apprendre comment ils ont géré leur situation et pour partager vos émotions et vos expériences.

Vous pouvez également désirer consulter un conseiller professionnel, tel qu’un psychologue, afin de vous aider à gérer vos émotions. La majorité des gens trouvent qu’ils gèrent mieux leur maladie s’ils ont un bon soutien émotionnel. Trouvez le soutien émotionnel qui vous convient.

Les techniques pour réduire l’anxiété, telles que la méditation ou la relaxation, peuvent vous aider à traverser votre expérience du cancer. Plusieurs programmes, par exemple notre programme de mentorat, sont offerts afin de vous enseigner la façon de mieux gérer le stress.


Relations interpersonnelles

Le cancer change non seulement votre vie, mais également la vie de ceux qui vous entourent. Partager votre expérience du cancer avec des proches peut renforcer certaines relations, mais d’autres peuvent devenir plus tendues et même se terminer.

La plupart des personnes sont encourageantes et attentionnées lorsqu’elles apprennent qu’une personne qui leur est chère est atteinte d’un cancer, mais d’autres peuvent avoir de la difficulté à faire face à leurs propres émotions face à votre diagnostic. Elles peuvent réagir en se retirant, en vous blâmant d’avoir le cancer, en faisant des remarques telles que « tu es chanceux que cela se traite » ou en vous donnant des conseils que vous n’avez pas demandés.

Leurs réactions peuvent vous blesser ou vous fâcher à un moment où vous avez vraiment besoin de soutien. Les personnes qui réagissent ainsi le font en raison de leurs propres peurs et non par manque d’empathie. Vous devez décider quelles seront les personnes que vous informerez de votre diagnostic et de ce que vous leur direz. Avoir quelqu’un d’autre à qui parler peut s’avérer utile et même énergisant.


Âge

Le cancer peut survenir à n’importe quelle étape de la vie d’un individu. Chaque étape apporte son lot de préoccupations, et vous trouverez peut-être utile d’en discuter avec des gens de votre groupe d’âge.

Les jeunes sont souvent préoccupés par l’effet du cancer sur leurs études, la possibilité d’entreprendre une carrière, leurs relations sociales et la possibilité d’avoir un compagnon ou de fonder une famille. Les individus d’âge moyen trouvent souvent que le cancer a un effet sur leur carrière et rend plus difficile la tâche de s’occuper des gens qui dépendent d’eux, tels que des enfants ou des parents âgés.

Les personnes âgées peuvent s’inquiéter des effets du cancer sur leurs autres problèmes de santé, craindre de ne pas recevoir assez de soutien et de perdre l’occasion de profiter de leur retraite.

Il est important de faire face à vos préoccupations et de les gérer. Vous pouvez adhérer à un groupe de soutien précisément destiné aux patients atteints d’un cancer colorectal qui vivent des expériences semblables.


Image de soi

Bien que la perte de cheveux ne soit pas associée à tous les traitements contre le cancer colorectal, vous remarquerez peut-être des changements à court terme affectant votre image, tels qu’une perte de cheveux, une peau sèche, des ongles cassants, une peau plus terne et le syndrome mains-pieds. Le programme Belle et bien dans sa peau enseigne aux femmes atteintes de cancer la façon de prendre en charge leur apparence physique.


Fatigue

La fatigue est un effet secondaire fréquent qui peut vous imposer des limites sur ce que vous pouvez accomplir dans une journée en particulier. Vous devez considérer la question de continuer à travailler ou à étudier à temps plein. Établissez des priorités. Ralentissez le rythme de vos activités et écoutez votre corps. Cessez vos activités et reposez-vous lorsque vous êtes fatigué.


Thérapies complémentaires ou solutions de rechange

La méditation, la relaxation et la visualisation aident souvent les patients atteints de cancer à diminuer leur niveau de stress et d’anxiété, ainsi qu’à maintenir une attitude positive. Il existe plusieurs types de thérapies qui favorisent la relaxation. Votre équipe de soins de santé ou votre groupe de soutien peuvent vous aider à trouver des ateliers qui enseignent ces techniques. L’exercice est également important afin de réduire le stress et la frustration. Faites l’expérience de différentes techniques ou activités afin de trouver celles qui améliorent votre sentiment de bien-être.

Vous pourriez être tenté d’essayer des traitements de médecine « naturelle » tels que des vitamines, des remèdes à base d’herbes ou d’autres thérapies qui, sans preuve médicale à l’appui, sont publicisés comme remèdes miracles contre le cancer. L’utilisation de ces thérapies médicamenteuses de rechange contenant possiblement des ingrédients inconnus qui n’ont pas fait l’objet de tests scientifiques approuvés peut entrer en conflit avec le traitement prescrit par votre équipe de soins de santé et le rendre moins efficace.

Afin de vous assurer que vous recevez le traitement le plus efficace pour votre cas, discutez de votre intérêt pour ces autres thérapies avec votre équipe de soins avant de les essayer, particulièrement durant votre traitement.

Colorectal Cancer Canada has compiled an online glossary of colorectal cancer-related terms to help you familiarize yourself with the language used on this site or used by your doctor.  The Glossary is designed to help promote awareness and facilitate your understanding of the disease as much as possible.

Il existe différentes options de traitement pour les patients atteints d’un cancer de l’anus. Certains traitements sont standards (traitements actuellement utilisés) et certains sont évalués dans le cadre d’essais cliniques. Les essais cliniques évaluent les moyens d’améliorer les traitements actuels et fournissent de l’information sur de nouvelles options thérapeutiques pour les patients atteints de cancer. Pour en apprendre plus sur les essais cliniques, veuillez consulter votre médecin.

Trois options de traitement standard sont utilisées :

  • Radiothérapie  - utilise des rayons X ou d’autres types de radiation de haute énergie pour tuer les cellules cancéreuses. Il existe deux types de radiothérapie. La radiothérapie externe utilise un appareil à l’extérieur du corps pour diriger la radiation vers la tumeur. La radiothérapie interne utilise des substances radioactives scellées dans des aiguilles, des petits grains, des fils ou des cathéters. Ces substances sont ensuite insérées dans le corps, soit directement dans la tumeur, soit dans la région environnante. La dose de radiation administrée pendant le traitement, le moment auquel elle est administrée et la façon dont elle est administrée dépendront du type de cancer à traiter et de son stade.
  • Chimiothérapie  - utilise des médicaments anticancéreux (cytotoxiques) pour stopper la croissance des cellules cancéreuses, soit en tuant les cellules, soit en stoppant la division cellulaire. Lorsque la chimiothérapie est administrée par voie orale ou injectée dans une veine ou un muscle, les médicaments passent dans la circulation sanguine, circulent dans tout le corps et détruisent les cellules cancéreuses, y compris celles qui peuvent s’être détachées de la tumeur primitive (chimiothérapie systémique). Lorsque la chimiothérapie est administrée directement dans le liquide céphalorachidien, un organe ou une cavité corporelle comme l’abdomen, les médicaments agissent principalement sur les cellules cancéreuses présentes dans ces régions (chimiothérapie régionale). Le type et la dose de chimiothérapie administrée pendant le traitement, le moment auquel elle est administrée et la façon dont elle est administrée dépendront du type de cancer à traiter et de son stade.
  • Intervention chirurgicale  - résection locale de la tumeur de l’anus le long d’une marge étroite de tissu sain autour de la tumeur. On a recours à cette intervention chirurgicale si le cancer est de petite taille et ne s’est pas propagé. Celle-ci peut de plus permettre de préserver les muscles du sphincter pour que le patient puisse continuer à contrôler ses selles. Les tumeurs qui apparaissent dans la partie inférieure de l’anus peuvent souvent être retirées par résection locale.

La résection abdominopérinéale consiste à retirer l’anus, le rectum et une partie du côlon sigmoïde au moyen d’une incision pratiquée dans l’abdomen. Les ganglions lymphatiques auxquels le cancer s’est propagé peuvent également être retirés au cours de cette intervention. Lorsque ces organes sont retirés, le chirurgien crée une nouvelle ouverture (stomie) à la surface de l’abdomen pour que les selles puissent être évacuées dans une poche jetable située à l’extérieur du corps. C’est ce que l’on appelle une colostomie.

Source:

National Cancer Institute

Resection of the colon with colostomy. Image courtesy of the National Cancer Institute

On a recours à des examens du rectum et de l’anus pour détecter et diagnostiquer le cancer de l’anus. Les examens suivants pourront être utilisés :

  • Antécédents médicaux et examen physique : un professionnel de la santé passera en revue les antécédents des habitudes de vie du patient, les symptômes qu’il présente, ainsi que les maladies dont il a souffert et les traitements qu’il a reçus. Un examen du corps sera également effectué. Le médecin vérifiera l’état de santé général du patient en vue de déceler notamment les signes de maladie, comme des masses ou tout autre signe qui semble inhabituel.
  • Toucher rectal (TR) :  examen de l’anus et du rectum. Le médecin ou un membre du personnel infirmier insérera un doigt ganté lubrifié dans la partie inférieure du rectum à la recherche de masses ou de tout autre signe qui semble inhabituel.
  • Anuscopie : examen de l’anus et de la partie inférieure du rectum effectué à l’aide d’un tube court muni d’une lumière (un anuscope).
  • Proctoscopie : examen du rectum effectué à l’aide d’un tube court muni d’une lumière et d’une caméra (un proctoscope).
  • Échographie endoanale ou endorectale : examen qui consiste à insérer une sonde (transducteur) ultrasonore dans l’anus ou le rectum. Des ondes sonores de haute fréquence rebondissent sur les tissus ou les organes internes et produisent des échos. Ces échos forment un tracé des structures du corps que l’on appelle sonogramme.
  • Biopsie : prélèvement de tissus ou de cellules du corps pour qu’un pathologiste puisse les examiner au microscope afin de déceler des signes de cancer. Si une anomalie est observée lors d’une anuscopie, une biopsie peut être réalisée en même temps.
  • Frottis anal de Pap : Comme c’est le cas lors d’un test de Pap, une analyse cytologique du frottis anal, ou frottis anal de Pap, est effectuée pour déceler la présence de cellules anormales dans le revêtement de l’anus. Cet examen peut contribuer à la détection du cancer de l’anus aux stades les plus précoces et les plus faciles à traiter.
Digital rectal exam (DRE). Image courtesy of the National Cancer Institute
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/anal/Patient/page1

Facteurs de risque :

Il existe plusieurs facteurs qui peuvent augmenter le risque de développer le type de cancer de l’anus le plus courant, à savoir le carcinome épidermoïde de l’anus. Parmi ces facteurs, on retrouve les suivants :

  • Infection au virus du papillome humain (VPH)
  • Nombre élevé de partenaires sexuelss
  • Relations sexuelles anales passives (pénétration anale)
  • Usage de cigarettes
  • Rougeurs, enflures et douleurs fréquentes à l’anus
  • Présence de fistules anales (ouvertures anormales)
  • Système immunitaire affaibli (c.-à-d. les personnes atteintes du VIH, celles qui ont subi une greffe d’organe ou encore celles qui prennent des immunodépresseurs)

Symptômes :

Les signes et symptômes du cancer de l’anus présentés ci-dessous peuvent également être provoqués par d’autres problèmes de santé. Il est important de consulter un médecin si ces symptômes ou tout autre symptôme inhabituel se manifestent. Parmi les signes et symptômes du cancer de l’anus, on retrouve les suivants :

  • Saignement de l’anus ou du rectum
  • Douleur ou pression dans la région anale
  • Démangeaisons ou écoulements de l’anus
  • Masse ou enflure dans la région anale
  • Changement du transit intestinal (changements de la taille des selles, constipation, diarrhée ou alternance entre constipation et diarrhée)

Le cancer de l’anus est une maladie caractérisée par la formation de cellules malignes (cancéreuses) dans les tissus de l’anus. À la suite d’un diagnostic, des analyses sont effectuées pour déterminer si les cellules cancéreuses se sont propagées dans l’anus ou à d’autres parties du corps.

Au départ, les changements au sein d’une cellule sont anormaux, et non cancéreux. Les chercheurs croient toutefois que certains de ces changements anormaux constituent la première étape d’une série de lents changements pouvant mener au cancer. Certaines des cellules anormales disparaissent sans traitement, mais d’autres peuvent devenir cancéreuses. Cette phase de la maladie se nomme dysplasie (une croissance anormale des cellules). La dysplasie qui se produit dans l’anus se nomme néoplasie intra-épithéliale anale (AIN) ou lésions malpighiennes intra-épithéliales (SIL) de l’anus. Des excroissances — comme des polypes ou des verrues — qui ne sont pas cancéreuses peuvent également apparaître dans l’anus ou autour de celui-ci; certaines peuvent devenir cancéreuses au fil du temps. Dans certains cas, le tissu précancéreux doit être enlevé pour empêcher le cancer de se développer. L’anus se compose de différents types de cellules qui peuvent tous devenir cancéreux.

Il existe plusieurs types différents de cancer de l’anus selon le type de cellules où le cancer apparaît :

  • Le carcinome épidermoïde est le type de cancer de l’anus le plus courant. Ce cancer prend naissance dans le revêtement externe du canal anal.
  • Le carcinome cloacogénique représente environ le quart de tous les cas de cancers de l’anus. Ce type de cancer prend naissance dans la partie externe de l’anus et dans la partie inférieure du rectum. Le carcinome cloacogénique prend probablement naissance dans des cellules semblables à celles touchées par le carcinome épidermoïde, et on le traite de manière semblable.
  • L’adénocarcinome prend naissance dans les glandes qui fabriquent le mucus et qui sont situées sous le revêtement de l’anus.
  • Le carcinome basocellulaire est un type de cancer de la peau qui peut apparaître dans la peau périanale (qui entoure l’anus).
  • Le mélanome prend naissance dans les cellules productrices de pigment (couleur) situées dans la peau ou le revêtement de l’anus.
  • Les tumeurs stromales gastro-intestinales sont des cancers de l’anus rares que l’on retrouve beaucoup plus fréquemment dans l’estomac ou l’intestin grêle. Lorsque ces tumeurs sont détectées au stade précoce, elles sont enlevées par intervention chirurgicale. Si elles se sont propagées au-delà de l’anus, elles peuvent être traitées par traitement médicamenteux.

Stadification du cancer de l’anus

La stadification décrit l’étendue du cancer en fonction du degré d’atteinte de l’anus et de la propagation du cancer à d’autres organes. Il est important de connaître le stade de la maladie afin d’être en mesure de planifier le traitement le plus approprié.

La stadification du carcinome épidermoïde de l’anus se fait comme suit :

  • Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) - des cellules anormales sont présentes dans le revêtement le plus interne de l’anus. Ces cellules anormales peuvent devenir cancéreuses et se propager aux tissus normaux voisins.
  • Stage I - le cancer s’est formé. La tumeur mesure 2 centimètres ou moins.
  • Stage II  - la tumeur mesure plus de 2 centimètres.
  • Stage IIIA - la tumeur peut être de n’importe quelle taille et s’est propagée aux ganglions lymphatiques près du rectum ou aux organes voisins comme le vagin, l’urètre et la vessie.
  • Stage IIIB - la tumeur peut être de n’importe quelle taille et s’est propagée 1) aux organes voisins et aux ganglions lymphatiques près du rectum, ou 2) aux ganglions lymphatiques d’un côté du bassin ou de l’aine, et peut s’être propagée aux organes voisins, ou 3) aux ganglions lymphatiques près du rectum et à l’aine, ou aux ganglions lymphatiques des deux côtés du bassin ou de l’aine, et peut s’être propagée aux organes voisins.
  • Stage IV - la tumeur peut être de n’importe quelle taille et le cancer peut s’être propagé aux ganglions lymphatiques ou aux organes voisins, et s’est propagé à des organes ou tissus plus éloignés.
What is colorectal cancer?

What is Anal Cancer?

Anal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the anus. Following a diagnosis, tests are performed....

Learn More
What is colorectal cancer?

Risk Factors and Symptoms

There are several factors which may increase the risk of developing the most common type anal cancer – squamous cell anal cancer. These...

Learn More
What is colorectal cancer?

Diagnosis

Tests that examine the rectum and anus are used to detect and diagnose anal cancer. The following procedures may be used...

Learn More
What is colorectal cancer?

Treatment Anal Cancer

Different treatment options exist for patients with anal cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are...

Learn More

Il est important de communiquer régulièrement avec votre médecin afin de prendre des décisions éclairées en ce qui concerne vos soins de santé. Si vous croyez être atteint d’un cancer, si vous recevez un diagnostic de cancer ou si vous composez avec les effets secondaires de la chimiothérapie, il est important de savoir quelles questions poser à votre médecin afin de bien vous préparer à prévenir, à prendre en charge et à traiter la maladie. Plus vous vous renseignerez au sujet du cancer colorectal, plus il vous sera facile de prendre des décisions éclairées importantes.

Cancer colorectal Canada a dressé une liste de questions exhaustive que les patients peuvent poser à leur médecin traitant en fonction des circonstances propres à chacun et du type de traitement souhaité.


Questions à poser à votre médecin au sujet du dépistage du cancer colorectal

  • Selon mes antécédents familiaux et médicaux, est-ce que je présente l’un ou l’autre des facteurs de risque qui me prédisposeraient à développer un cancer colorectal?
  • Mes enfants ou les autres membres de ma famille présentent-ils un risque accru de développer un cancer colorectal?
  • Si je présente des facteurs de risque, puis-je apporter des changements pour réduire ces risques?
  • Quels sont les signes et les symptômes auxquels je devrais faire attention?
  • Devrais-je me soumettre à des épreuves de dépistage du cancer colorectal?
  • Si oui, lesquelles me recommandez-vous?
  • Comment dois-je me préparer à ces épreuves? Dois-je modifier mon régime alimentaire ou la prise de mes médicaments habituels?
  • Comment l’épreuve se déroulera-t-elle? Sera-t-elle pénible ou douloureuse? Comporte-t-elle des risques?
  • À quel moment vais-je obtenir mes résultats et qui me les transmettra?
  • Si je dois passer une coloscopie ou une sigmoïdoscopie, qui effectuera l’examen?
  • Est-ce que quelqu’un devra m’accompagner le jour de l’examen?
  • À quelle fréquence vais-je devoir passer une coloscopie?

Questions à poser à votre médecin si l’on soupçonne que vous êtes atteint d’un cancer colorectal

  • Qu’est-ce qui vous fait croire que j’ai un cancer colorectal?
  • Quels autres problèmes de santé pourraient causer mes symptômes?
  • Quels sont les facteurs de risque courants du cancer colorectal?
  • Est-ce que je présente un risque accru de développer la maladie? Pourquoi ou pourquoi pas?
  • Quels types d’examens et d’épreuves diagnostiques doit-on réaliser pour diagnostiquer un cancer du côlon ou du rectum?
  • Comment ces tests se déroulent-ils?
  • Comment devrais-je me préparer à ces épreuves diagnostiques du cancer colorectal?
  • Consignes :
  • Après avoir passé les tests, vais-je être capable de conduire pour retourner chez moi, ou dois-je demander à quelqu’un de me raccompagner?
  • Vais-je avoir besoin d’une aide particulière à la maison après avoir passé ces épreuves diagnostiques?
  • Dois-je téléphoner pour recevoir mes résultats ou bien quelqu’un communiquera avec moi?
  • Date à laquelle téléphoner :
  • Numéro de téléphone à composer :

Questions à poser à votre médecin après avoir reçu un diagnostic de cancer colorectal

  • De quel type de cancer du côlon suis-je atteint?
  • Quel est le stade de mon cancer?
  • Quelles sont mes options de traitement?
  • Quel est mon pronostic?
  • Quels médecins me recommandez-vous?
  • Me permettrez-vous d’enregistrer nos rencontres?
  • De quel type de cancer du côlon suis-je atteint?
  • À quel endroit le cancer se situe-t-il exactement dans le côlon?
  • Êtes-vous en mesure de me dire si mon cancer s’est propagé au-delà de mon côlon?
  • Êtes-vous en mesure de m’informer du stade de mon cancer?
  • Si la réponse est non, quels sont les tests auxquels je devrai me soumettre pour connaître le stade de mon cancer?
  • Y a-t-il d’autres tests à effectuer avant que l’on puisse décider du traitement à suivre?
  • Êtes-vous en mesure de me dire à quelle vitesse mon cancer est susceptible de croître?
  • Est-ce que cela fera une différence si je modifie mon régime alimentaire?
  • Mon diagnostic signifie-t-il que mes parents par le sang présentent un risque accru d’être un jour atteints d’un cancer colorectal? Devraient-ils aborder la question du dépistage avec leurs médecins?
  • Selon mon diagnostic, quelles sont mes options de traitement?
  • Quelle option de traitement me recommandez-vous? Pourquoi?
  • Mon pronostic se fonde-t-il sur le type et le stade possible du cancer colorectal?
  • Quels autres médecins vais-je devoir consulter pour le traitement de ma maladie? Devrais-je consulter un chirurgien? Un oncologue médical? Un radio-oncologue? Ces médecins devraient-ils participer à la planification de mon traitement avant qu’il ne commence?
  • Spécialistes :
  • Comment faire pour communiquer avec les membres de mon équipe de soins de santé?
  • Numéros de téléphone à composer :
  • Suis-je un bon candidat pour l’ablation chirurgicale de la tumeur colorectale? Si oui, quel type d’intervention chirurgicale me recommandez-vous?
  • Si oui, devrais-je me soumettre à l’intervention chirurgicale avant une date précise?
  • Pendant combien de temps puis-je retarder de manière sécuritaire l’intervention chirurgicale pendant que j’évalue les options de traitement et les médecins qui m’ont été recommandés?
  • Devrais-je obtenir un deuxième avis médical avant d’amorcer un traitement anticancéreux? Pourquoi ou pourquoi pas?

Une liste de questions plus vaste et plus complète au sujet du diagnostic et du traitement du cancer colorectal est disponible ici


Questions au sujet de l’obtention d’un deuxième avis médical

Certains patients peuvent avoir de la difficulté à dire à leurs médecins qu’ils souhaitent obtenir un deuxième avis médical. Il peut être utile de savoir qu’il est assez courant pour les patients de chercher à obtenir un deuxième avis médical, et que la plupart des médecins sont à l’aise avec cette pratique. Si vous ne savez pas par où commencer, la liste de questions qui suit peut vous aider à aborder le sujet avec votre médecin :

  • Avant d’amorcer le traitement, j’aimerais obtenir un deuxième avis médical. M’aiderez-vous dans mes démarches?
  • Si vous étiez atteint du même type de cancer que moi, à qui demanderiez-vous un deuxième avis médical?
  • Je crois que j’aimerais consulter un autre médecin pour m’assurer d’avoir bien analysé la question.
  • J’envisage d’obtenir un deuxième avis médical. Pouvez-vous me recommander quelqu’un? Si oui, qui me recommanderiez-vous et pourquoi?

Liste de contrôle des documents dont il faut garder une copie

À un moment ou à un autre, même si vous ne changez pas de médecins avant ou pendant le traitement, il se peut que vous vous retrouviez devant un nouveau médecin participant au traitement ou à la prise en charge de votre maladie. Il est important que vous puissiez communiquer à votre nouveau médecin des renseignements exacts concernant votre diagnostic et votre traitement. La liste de contrôle qui suit vous aidera à communiquer ces renseignements à votre nouveau médecin. Il vous est recommandé d’en conserver une copie en tout temps :

  • Une copie du rapport de pathologie obtenu à la suite de toute biopsie ou de toute intervention chirurgicale
  • Si vous avez subi une intervention chirurgicale, une copie du protocole opératoire
  • Si vous avez été hospitalisé, une copie du résumé de sortie que tous les médecins doivent préparer lorsque les patients quittent l’hôpital
  • Si vous avez subi une radiothérapie, un résumé final de la dose et du champ de rayonnement
  • Étant donné que certains médicaments peuvent avoir des effets secondaires à long terme, une liste de tous vos médicaments, des doses de vos médicaments et du moment où vous les avez pris (y compris les médicaments en vente libre)

À propos du dépistage

La majorité des cas de cancer colorectal peuvent être évités, mais chaque année au Canada, des milliers de personnes reçoivent tout de même un diagnostic de cancer colorectal avancé. Toutefois, si le cancer est détecté au stade précoce grâce au dépistage, il peut très bien être traité et peut-être même guéri. La majorité des cas de cancer colorectal se manifestent d’abord sous la forme de polypes bénins qui apparaissent dans la paroi du gros intestin; ce sont des polypes adénomateux. Au fil des années (cinq à dix ans), ces polypes grossissent et se multiplient, ce qui augmente le risque que des cellules présentes dans ces polypes deviennent cancéreuses, envahissent la paroi de l’intestin et se propagent à d’autres organes. Environ les deux tiers de ces cancers sont détectés dans le gros intestin, et un tiers dans le rectum. Le retrait précoce de ces excroissances empêchera l’apparition même du cancer colorectal. Par conséquent, la détection et le retrait des polypes sont essentiels à la prévention du développement du cancer colorectal.

Il est clair que de subir des tests de dépistage dans le cadre d’un examen physique périodique peut sauver des vies; en outre, les patients qui présentent des symptômes associés au cancer colorectal ou ceux qui présentent un risque élevé de cancer colorectal ne doivent pas tarder à subir un test de dépistage.

Le saviez-vous?

  1. La plupart des décès attribuables au cancer colorectal pourraient être évités si toutes les personnes âgées de 50 ans et plus se soumettaient périodiquement à des tests de dépistage
  2. On croit à tort que le cancer colorectal est une maladie qui touche principalement les hommes. Presque autant de femmes en sont atteintes.
  3. Dans plus de 90 % des cas, le cancer colorectal peut être traité de façon efficace s’il est diagnostiqué au stade précoce par un test de dépistage appelé coloscopie.

Sources:

https://basicmedicalkey.com/large-intestine/

https://www.atlantagastro.com/content/colon-cancer-screening

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1411669/pdf/gut00655-0062.pdf

http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/colorectal/statistics/?region=on


Types de tests de dépistage

Selon la Société canadienne du cancer, les tests ou épreuves de dépistage doivent être effectués quand le patient se sent bien, afin de détecter d’éventuelles anomalies de façon précoce, soit avant que des signes et des symptômes de la maladie se manifestent.

Le Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (GÉCSSP) a formulé les recommandations suivantes en matière de dépistage pour les adultes de 50 ans et plus qui ne présentent pas un risque élevé de cancer colorectal. Elles ne s’appliquent pas aux personnes qui ont déjà eu un cancer colorectal ou des polypes, qui sont atteintes d’une maladie inflammatoire chronique de l’intestin, qui présentent des signes ou des symptômes de cancer colorectal ou qui ont un ou plusieurs parents au premier degré présentant des antécédents de cancer colorectal, ou aux adultes atteints de syndromes héréditaires les prédisposant au cancer colorectal (p. ex. le syndrome de Lynch).

Plusieurs tests servent à dépister le cancer colorectal et les polypes :

  1. Recherche de sang occulte dans les selles par test au gaïac (RSOSg) : un test au cours duquel un échantillon des selles peut être recueilli et rapporté au médecin ou à un laboratoire pour une recherche de sang occulte (caché).
  2. Test fécal immunochimique (TFi ou RSOSi) : : un test utilisant des anticorps pour détecter la présence de protéines d’hémoglobine humaine dans les selles. À l’instar de la RSOSg, ce test détecte la présence de sang dans les selles et peut être plus précis.
  3. Sigmoïdoscopie à sonde souple : un appareil mince, flexible, muni à une extrémité d’une lumière et d’une petite caméra, est introduit par l’anus afin de voir l’intérieur de la partie inférieure du côlon et du rectum (ce qui représente environ les deux derniers pieds de l’appareil digestif) et de déterminer la présence de polypes ou de cellules cancéreuses.
  4. Coloscopie: ce test permet d’examiner le rectum et le côlon en entier, au moyen d’un appareil appelé coloscope; celui-ci est muni d’une lumière et est, essentiellement, une version plus longue d’un sigmoïdoscope.
  5. Coloscopie par TDM (coloscopie virtuelle) : un examen moins effractif au cours duquel un appareil à rayons X spécialisé est utilisé pour obtenir des photos du côlon et du rectum.
  6. Analyse de l’ADN dans les selles ou dans les matières fécales : à l’instar de la RSOS ou du TFi, l’analyse de l’ADN dans les selles est effectuée sur un échantillon de matières fécales, mais au lieu de détecter du sang, elle permet de déceler la présence d’ADN anormal pouvant signaler la présence d’un cancer ou de polypes dans le côlon.

Lignes directrices en matière de dépistage au Canada

Bien que divers organismes (y compris Cancer colorectal Canada) travaillent à faire augmenter le nombre de personnes faisant l’objet d’un dépistage approprié et à s’assurer que les services de dépistage du cancer sont de grande qualité partout au pays, chaque province et territoire au Canada est responsable de formuler ses propres lignes directrices en matière de dépistage du cancer colorectal. Ces lignes directrices se rapportent aux personnes appartenant aux trois catégories suivantes : asymptomatique, risque moyen et risque élevé.

Une liste de ressources en matière de dépistage du cancer colorectal pour chaque province et territoire est disponible ici.

En outre, le GÉCSSP, mis sur pied par l’Agence de la santé publique du Canada (ASPC), a publié en 2016 des lignes directrices précisant ses recommandations à l’échelle nationale en matière de pratique clinique dans le domaine du cancer colorectal. Ces dernières recommandent de procéder au dépistage du cancer colorectal chez les personnes présentant un risque moyen, âgées de 50 à 74 ans, par RSOS (TFg ou TFi) tous les deux ans, ou par sigmoïdoscopie à sonde souple tous les dix ans.

En outre, le GÉCSSP ne recommande pas les pratiques suivantes :

  • Dépistage du cancer colorectal chez les personnes de 75 ans et plus
  • Utilisation de la coloscopie comme test de dépistage du cancer colorectal

Le cancer colorectal est le deuxième cancer le plus souvent diagnostiqué au Canada et environ 26 800 Canadiens ont reçu un diagnostic de cette maladie en 2017. Votre vie joue un rôle important dans le risque de développer un cancer colorectal. En fait, selon le Fonds mondial de recherche sur le cancer, il est prouvé qu'être physiquement actif, adopter de saines habitudes alimentaires, ne pas fumer et maintenir un poids santé peut diminuer le risque de développer un cancer.

Vous avez le pouvoir d'agir et de réduire votre risque de développer un cancer colorectal. Laissez-nous vous aider avec des conseils utiles sur la prévention du cancer sur:


Saine alimentation

Consommer davantage de fruits et de légumes

Les statistiques révèlent que plus de la moitié des Canadiens consomment moins de cinq portions de fruits et de légumes par jour. C’est dommage, car l’on sait qu’ils sont riches en vitamines, en minéraux, en fibres et en composés phytochimiques ayant des propriétés anticancéreuses. Comme les fruits et les légumes ne procurent pas tous les mêmes bienfaits, il est important d’en consommer une grande variété. En prime, ils ajouteront tous à coup sûr des couleurs et des textures à votre assiette!

Le saviez-vous?

  1. Les légumes crucifères comme le brocoli et les choux de Bruxelles sont d’importantes sources de molécules ayant des propriétés anticancéreuses. Le fait d’en consommer régulièrement peut diminuer de 20 % le risque de développer un cancer colorectal.
  2. Les petits fruits sont une excellente source de polyphénols, qui ont un grand potentiel anticancéreux. Pourquoi ne pas en déguster en collation?
  3. Les agrumes comme les pamplemousses, les oranges et les mandarines sont riches en vitamines et ont également la capacité d’augmenter le potentiel anticancéreux d’autres composés phytochimiques présents dans les aliments. Il est préférable de consommer le fruit entier plutôt que le jus seulement, car cela diminue l’apport en glucides et augmente l’apport en fibres.

Réduire la consommation de viande rouge et de viandes transformées

Les recherches le montrent clairement : la viande rouge (bœuf, agneau et porc) devrait être consommée avec modération afin de réduire le risque de cancer colorectal. La viande rouge peut être une importante source de fer et de protéines; il n’y a donc aucune raison de l’éliminer entièrement de votre alimentation. Toutefois, essayez de vous en tenir à des portions ne dépassant pas la paume de la main et de ne pas en consommer plus de 3 portions par semaine. De plus, variez votre menu pour y intégrer des viandes maigres comme le poulet et la dinde, et essayez de remplacer la viande par d’autres sources de protéines comme les œufs et les légumineuses.

Pour ce qui est des viandes transformées comme les saucisses, le jambon et le bacon, il est important d’en limiter la consommation, car elle a été associée à une hausse du risque de cancer colorectal.

Le saviez-vous?

  1. Une consommation élevée de viande rouge et de viandes transformées augmente de 30 % le risque de développer un cancer colorectal.
  2. La cuisson de la viande au barbecue produit des composés toxiques appelés hydrocarbures aromatiques qui se collent à la surface de la viande et peuvent agir comme agents cancérogènes (composés qui causent le cancer).
  3. Le poisson comme le saumon et les sardines contiennent des acides gras oméga-3 qui contribuent à la santé cardiovasculaire et à la prévention du cancer. Santé Canada recommande de consommer au moins 2 repas de poisson contenant des acides gras oméga-3 par semaine.

Savourer des grains entiers

Le Guide alimentaire canadien recommande de consommer au moins la moitié des portions de produits céréaliers sous forme de grains entiers. Ils constituent une excellente source de vitamine B, de minéraux et de fibres. Les fibres sont des substances présentes naturellement dans les plantes comestibles, comme les grains, les noix, les graines, les légumineuses, les légumes et les fruits, et que l’organisme ne digère pas. Elles absorbent l’eau et augmentent le volume des selles, ce qui permet d’accélérer le transit des déchets alimentaires dans les intestins; elles absorbent également les agents cancérogènes et d’autres toxines lors de leur passage dans le colorectum. Elles jouent un rôle essentiel au maintien de la santé digestive!

Le saviez-vous?

  1. Les études montrent qu’un apport important en fibres alimentaires peut contribuer à réduire le risque de développer un cancer colorectal.

Consommer suffisamment de calcium et de vitamine D

Les statistiques montrent que les deux tiers des Canadiens ne consomment pas suffisamment de produits laitiers, même si Santé Canada recommande d’en consommer deux portions par jour pour un adulte, une portion correspondant à 250 ml de lait, 175 g de yogourt ou 50 g de fromage. Les produits laitiers font partie d’une alimentation saine et jouent un rôle important dans le maintien de la santé des os. Ils fournissent jusqu’à 16 nutriments essentiels comme du calcium, de la vitamine D, du phosphore, des protéines et du zinc, pour n’en nommer que quelques-uns. Les produits laitiers fermentés comme le yogourt fournissent en prime des bactéries probiotiques qui contribuent à la santé du microbiote du tractus intestinal.

Le saviez-vous?

  1. Selon le World Cancer Research Fund et l’American Institute for Cancer Research, il existe des données probantes selon lesquelles le lait pourrait avoir un effet protecteur contre le cancer colorectal. L’effet synergique du calcium, de la vitamine D et d’autres substances présentes dans le lait pourrait y contribuer. De façon plus précise, il semble que le calcium présent dans le lait contribue à prévenir l’apparition de polypes bénins dans le côlon, l’un des signes précoces de cancer colorectal.

Choisir les matières grasses avec soin

Lorsqu’il est question de matières grasses, sachez que la qualité importe autant que la quantité. Notre organisme a besoin d’acides gras qui contribuent à son fonctionnement; toutefois, si l’on en consomme régulièrement en trop grande quantité, cela peut contribuer à la prise de poids et à l’augmentation des taux sanguins de cholestérol et de triglycérides, et entraîner de graves problèmes de santé. Les matières grasses n’ont pas toutes les mêmes valeurs nutritives, et certaines procurent davantage de bienfaits que d’autres. Par exemple, les acides gras oméga-3 que l’on retrouve dans certains poissons (saumon, truite) et certaines graines et noix (lin, chia, noix de Grenoble et huile de canola) sont essentiels, ce qui signifie qu’ils ne sont pas produits par le corps humain; ils doivent donc provenir des aliments que nous consommons.

Les études ont montré que les pires matières grasses sont les gras trans. Les gras trans sont produits de façon industrielle; ils se retrouvent dans la graisse alimentaire et dans bon nombre de grignotines, de produits de boulangerie et d’aliments frits servis en restauration rapide. Ils ont été associés à un risque accru de maladie cardiovasculaire et n’ont certainement aucun effet protecteur contre le cancer. Il est préférable de les éviter et de choisir des options plus saines.

De plus, lorsque vous faites votre épicerie, ne tenez pas compte uniquement de la teneur en matières grasses d’un produit; tenez également compte des autres nutriments que l’aliment a à offrir (vitamines, minéraux, protéines, fibres…). Parfois, les produits faibles en matières grasses et sans matières grasses contiennent davantage de glucides que les produits ordinaires et ne constituent donc pas toujours le meilleur choix. La modération demeure la clé!

Le saviez-vous?

  1. L’huile d’olive extra-vierge est un concentré des antioxydants et des polyphénols présents dans les olives. Les recherches ont montré que ces molécules ont des propriétés anticancéreuses et anti-inflammatoires.
  2. Les bienfaits pour la santé des acides gras oméga-3 ne se limitent pas aux maladies cardiovasculaires. Une consommation élevée de poissons comme le saumon, la truite et les sardines peut réduire de 37 % le risque de cancer colorectal.
  3. Les noix contiennent des graisses insaturées qui constituent de bons choix pour une alimentation saine.

Consommer de l’alcool avec modération et bien s’hydrater

Il a été démontré qu’une consommation régulière d’alcool en quantité excessive accroît le risque de développer un cancer colorectal. Il est recommandé aux femmes de limiter leur consommation à un verre par jour, aux hommes, de ne pas boire plus de deux verres par jour, et de ne pas boire tous les jours. Un verre correspond à 340 ml (12 oz) de bière, 140 ml (5 oz) de vin et 45 ml (1,5 oz) de spiritueux.

Bien s’hydrater ne signifie pas simplement d’éviter de boire de l’alcool en quantité excessive; cela signifie également de s’assurer de boire suffisamment d’eau (au moins 2 litres par jour). De plus, il faut se méfier des boissons sucrées, car une canette de boisson gazeuse contient 8 cuillères à thé de sucre. Imaginez alors la quantité de sucre que contient une boisson grand format au cinéma!

Le saviez-vous?

  1. Le resvératrol, que l’on retrouve dans le vin rouge, a un pouvoir anticancéreux puissant qui semble responsable des effets bénéfiques du vin dans la prévention du développement de certains cancers. Ici encore, la modération est essentielle!
  2. Le fait de boire du thé vert régulièrement peut réduire de 57 % votre risque de développer un cancer colorectal. Il contient de grandes quantités de catéchines, des molécules qui ont des propriétés anticancéreuses.

Surveiller sa consommation de sel

Les Canadiens consomment en moyenne 3 500 mg de sodium par jour, soit près de 60 % de plus que l’apport maximal recommandé (1 500 mg). C’est beaucoup! La majeure partie du sel que nous consommons se cache dans les produits alimentaires transformés comme les repas surgelés, les soupes, les sauces, les collations et les viandes transformées. Vous serez peut-être surpris d’apprendre que les produits sucrés, comme les céréales à déjeuner et les biscuits, peuvent également renfermer de grandes quantités de sodium. Afin de faire de meilleurs choix, prenez le temps de lire l’étiquette des valeurs nutritives sur l’emballage, comparez différents produits et essayez d’éviter ceux qui contiennent beaucoup de sel.

Le saviez-vous?

  1. L’ail fraîchement pressé ajoute du goût à vos plats; vous pouvez donc ajouter moins de sel. Les études ont montré que l’ail contient des molécules qui peuvent freiner la croissance des cellules cancéreuses.
  2. N’hésitez pas à utiliser des épices comme le curcuma, le poivre, le gingembre et le cumin, et des fines herbes comme le persil, le thym, l’origan et le romarin. Elles contiennent également des molécules qui ont des propriétés anticancéreuses.

Être attentif aux signaux de satiété

Être attentif aux signaux de faim et de satiété (sensation d’être rassasié) signifie de manger lorsqu’on a faim et de savoir quand s’arrêter! Pour la plupart des gens, ce n’est pas aussi facile qu’on le pense. Il nous arrive malheureusement souvent d’éviter délibérément de manger, même lorsque nous ressentons des signaux de faim. Ainsi, nous sommes affamés lorsque l’heure du prochain repas arrive, ce qui nous incite souvent à trop manger et à ne pas savoir quand nous arrêter. Pour manger selon vos besoins, fiez-vous à votre sensation de satiété plutôt que de tenter de terminer à tout prix votre assiette. Si vous vous sentez rassasié, c’est que vous avez probablement assez mangé! Bien sûr, différents facteurs, comme l’activité physique, peuvent faire varier ces besoins d’une journée à l’autre.

Ralentissez, savourez ce que vous mangez et soyez attentif aux signaux que votre corps vous envoie!


Miser sur la variété

Aucun aliment ne contient toutes les molécules anticancéreuses qui peuvent contribuer à la prévention du cancer; il est donc important d’intégrer une grande variété d’aliments sains à vos habitudes alimentaires pour augmenter leur effet protecteur. La meilleure façon de savoir ce que vous mangez consiste à choisir avec soin les ingrédients avec lesquels vous cuisinerez!

N’oubliez pas non plus que tous les groupes alimentaires contiennent de bons nutriments particuliers qui sont importants pour la santé. Le Guide alimentaire canadien vous aide à avoir une alimentation équilibrée en vous indiquant la quantité de portions que vous devriez consommer pour chaque groupe alimentaire :

Les aliments contre le cancer

Un Canadien sur deux développera un cancer au cours de sa vie, mais des recherches ont montré que plus de 50% des cancers pourraient être évités grâce à un mode de vie sain. Le Fonds mondial de recherche sur le cancer a de solides preuves que l'activité physique, l'adoption de saines habitudes alimentaires et de la consommation d'alcool, le fait de ne pas fumer et de maintenir un poids santé peuvent diminuer les risques de développer un cancer.

Le programme Aliments qui lutte contre le cancer découle de la conviction qu'il est impératif de donner aux Canadiens les moyens de consommer des aliments moins transformés et de cuisiner des recettes plus saines pour réduire non seulement le cancer colorectal, mais aussi d'autres cancers

Il est nécessaire de communiquer efficacement et clairement les recommandations scientifiques crédibles en matière de prévention des aliments et du cancer. Plus important encore, nous pensons que nous devons avoir une influence positive sur un changement de comportement durable.

Pour en savoir plus et pour vous joindre à la communauté Foods that Fight Cancer, visitez notre site Web et suivez-nous sur les médias sociaux!


Activité physique

con-physicalActivity_full

On sait que le fait de mener une vie active apporte des bienfaits pour la santé, comme la prévention des maladies cardiovasculaires, du diabète et de certains cancers. En outre, il a été montré que cela améliore la santé gastro-intestinale en général, contribue à diminuer la constipation, améliore le sommeil et a un effet positif sur le moral.

L’Organisation mondiale de la Santé recommande aux adultes de faire au moins 150 minutes d’activité physique par semaine. Faites-en un peu tous les jours au lieu de tout faire en une seule séance; vous en retirerez ainsi davantage de bienfaits. Par exemple, vous pouvez faire des blocs d’activité physique de 30 minutes cinq fois par semaine. Pour être actif, il n’est pas nécessaire de s’inscrire à une salle de sport ou un gymnase; il existe de nombreuses activités qui conviennent à vos goûts et à votre style de vie. Il ne vous reste qu’à trouver celle que vous aimerez pratiquer! Vous pouvez également adapter votre quotidien en y intégrant davantage d’activité physique, comme éviter de rester assis trop longtemps et marcher davantage. Avez-vous des enfants? Sachez qu’ils doivent faire au moins 60 minutes d’activité physique par jour. Alors, sortez, bougez, amusez-vous!

Le saviez-vous?

  1. Les études ont montré que les gens qui font régulièrement une activité physique d’intensité modérée, comme la marche rapide, la danse ou le patin, sont moins susceptibles de développer un cancer colorectal (réduction du risque de 25 %). Ceux qui s’adonnent régulièrement à une activité physique d’intensité élevée, comme la course, le vélo ou le ski de fond, présentent un risque encore plus faible.

Poids

Des données probantes démontrent que la surcharge pondérale ou l’obésité augmente le risque de développer 11 cancers, dont le cancer colorectal. Il faut également tenir compte du tour de taille, car l’on sait qu’un excès de tissus adipeux dans la région abdominale représente un facteur de risque pour bon nombre de problèmes de santé. Les habitudes alimentaires et l’activité physique jouent des rôles importants dans l’atteinte d’un poids santé. Les sections précédentes « Saine alimentation » et « Activité physique » vous donnent des conseils sur la façon de faire de bons choix alimentaires et de demeurer actif.

Attention, les régimes alimentaires très restrictifs qui sont trop faibles en calories et mal équilibrés sont à éviter. Ces régimes amincissants sont souvent impossibles à suivre à long terme, surtout si vous avez faim tout le temps et que l’on vous dit d’éviter certains aliments à tout prix. Ils peuvent mener à des troubles alimentaires, qui découlent de l’obsession et de l’envie irrésistible de consommer les aliments interdits, ce qui entraîne souvent une prise de poids au fil du temps. Pour trouver un régime alimentaire sain afin de perdre du poids, il est recommandé de consulter un diététiste qui est formé pour vous aider à modifier vos comportements alimentaires une étape à la fois afin d’obtenir des résultats durables.

Le saviez-vous?

  1. L'obésité augmente le risque de développer un cancer de plus de 40%

Références :

Santé Canada. Nutrition et saine alimentation, 2013.

Saine alimentation Ontario. Perdre du poids - Conseils pratiques sur les façons d’atteindre et de conserver un poids santé

Extenso. Le Centre de référence sur la nutrition de l’Université de Montréal. 5 bonnes raisons de ne pas suivre une diète amaigrissante. 2016

Teixeira, PJ., Carraca, EV et coll. « Succesful behavior change in obesity interventions in adults : a systematic review of self-regulation mediators ». BMC Medicine, 2015

Blomain, ES., Dirhan, DA et coll. « Mechanisms of weight regain following weight loss ». ISRN Obesity, 2013; 210524


Cesser de fumer

Cesser de fumer est l'une des meilleures choses à faire pour améliorer votre vie et votre santé. Le tabagisme est un facteur de risque notoire de cancer dans les organes en contact direct avec des cancérogènes liés au tabac, tels que le poumon, l'oropharynx, le larynx et le tube digestif supérieur, mais aussi côlon. Le tabagisme est significativement associé à l'incidence du cancer colorectal. Un large éventail de substances toxiques produites par la fumée de tabac peut pénétrer dans l'organisme par la salive ou la circulation sanguine et se rendre jusqu'à la muqueuse de l'intestin où elles peuvent endommager l'ADN cellulaire et entraîner la formation de cancers.

Une deuxième chance et de nouvelles priorités


La vie en rémission

La rémission correspond à la diminution ou à la disparition des signes et des symptômes de cancer, même si le cancer peut toujours être présent dans l’organisme. La vie en rémission peut à la fois être une source de soulagement et d’inquiétude — l’on peut se sentir soulagé de la disparition de la tumeur, mais craindre qu’elle ne réapparaisse. Il est important pour vous de composer avec les changements dans votre façon d’envisager votre vie, vos relations et votre perception de vous-même. Tout en espérant que la maladie demeure en rémission, il est également important de garder à l’esprit qu’elle pourrait récidiver. Prenez le temps de prendre soin de votre santé et suivez les recommandations de votre médecin en ce qui concerne les visites de suivi.


Si le cancer réapparaît

Si vous connaissez une récidive, la détresse psychologique pourrait être encore plus vive que lorsque vous avez reçu votre diagnostic, car vous aviez espéré et cru que votre cancer était guéri. Toutefois, il pourrait vous être plus facile de composer avec la maladie la deuxième fois; en effet, vous savez déjà à quoi vous attendre, comment obtenir du soutien et comment prendre en charge votre maladie. N’oubliez pas que si le traitement de votre cancer a réussi une fois, il pourrait réussir à nouveau. Allez chercher tout le soutien dont vous avez besoin pour vous aider à passer au travers d’une récidive.


Composer avec la stérilité

Si vous envisagez d’avoir des enfants, il pourrait vous être utile de discuter des options qui s’offrent à vous avec vos professionnels de la santé avant de commencer le traitement. Si vous voulez avoir des enfants et que vous n’y arrivez pas en raison de votre traitement contre le cancer, vous pourriez devoir surmonter divers problèmes pratiques et affectifs. Vous pourriez surmonter votre déception seul, ou avoir besoin d’aide pour y arriver. Vous pouvez obtenir de l’aide auprès de votre partenaire, de vos amis, de votre famille ou de groupes de soutien.


Cinq façons de rester en santé

Pour la plupart des gens, l’âge et le régime alimentaire sont les facteurs qui contribuent au développement d’un cancer colorectal, et non leurs gènes. Vous ne pouvez rien faire contre votre âge et vos antécédents familiaux de la maladie; par contre, vous pouvez modifier certains des facteurs de risque qui sont liés au mode de vie. Les études indiquent que certaines décisions liées au mode de vie augmentent les facteurs de risque associés au cancer colorectal, comme l’usage du tabac, l’alimentation et la consommation d’alcool.

  1. Consommation d’alcool : l’alcool peut accroître votre risque de développer un cancer colorectal. Les personnes qui ne consomment pas d’alcool présentent des taux moindres de cancer colorectal. Même si l’on pense que la consommation d’alcool en petites quantités permet de réduire le risque de souffrir de certains types de maladies cardiovasculaires, il semble que l’alcool, surtout lorsqu’il est consommé en grandes quantités, peut contribuer à accroître la fréquence du cancer colorectal.
  2. Poids : la surcharge pondérale (surtout l’excès de graisses à la taille plutôt qu’aux hanches ou aux cuisses) accroît le risque de cancer, surtout chez les hommes.
  3. Activité physique : le manque d’activité physique a été associé à des taux accrus de cancer colorectal; il peut en outre mener à une prise de poids. Les personnes qui mènent une vie active avant de recevoir un diagnostic de cancer colorectal semblent mieux s’en sortir. Les personnes qui font régulièrement de l’activité physique après avoir reçu un diagnostic de cancer colorectal obtiennent souvent de meilleurs résultats.
  1. Usage du tabac : l’usage important et de longue durée du tabac peut également accroître votre risque de cancer colorectal. Les études indiquent que les fumeurs sont deux à trois fois plus susceptibles de présenter des polypes colorectaux.
  2. Alimentation : vos habitudes alimentaires peuvent influer sur votre risque de développer un cancer colorectal. Bon nombre de recherches ont été menées, mais il reste tout de même beaucoup de questions sans réponse. Il semble y avoir un lien entre la consommation de certains aliments et le risque de développer un cancer colorectal, mais les études à ce sujet se contredisent.
  3. Matières grasses : des études ont montré que les aliments à haute teneur en matières grasses (les aliments frits, la viande rouge et la « malbouffe » comme les croustilles et d’autres collations emballées) peuvent accroître votre risque de cancer colorectal. Les aliments à faible teneur en matières grasses vous aideront à conserver un poids santé. Cela réduira en outre votre risque de cancer colorectal.
  4. Fibres : certaines études suggèrent qu’un apport élevé en fibres peut avoir un effet protecteur sur le fonctionnement du côlon. De nombreuses études ont évalué les bienfaits des fibres dans la réduction du risque de cancer colorectal. Les fibres s’obtiennent en consommant beaucoup de légumes, de fruits, de grains entiers et de légumineuses (haricots, lentilles, noix).
  5. Fruits et légumes : la consommation d’au moins un légume ou un fruit par repas et par collation peut contribuer à vous protéger contre ce cancer et contre de nombreuses autres maladies. Votre risque pourrait être plus important si vous ne consommez pas suffisamment de fruits et de légumes.
  6. Consommation de viande : plusieurs études ont montré que la consommation de grandes quantités de viande rouge ou de viandes transformées joue un rôle dans le développement du cancer colorectal. La cuisson des viandes à haute température (en friture ou au barbecue) peut transformer des substances inoffensives présentes dans la viande en agents carcinogènes (qui causent le cancer).

Soutien affectif

Les personnes qui ont vécu des expériences semblables peuvent souvent offrir du soutien. Demandez à votre oncologue, à votre infirmière en oncologie ou à votre travailleur social en oncologie des renseignements au sujet des groupes de soutien dans votre région. De plus, Cancer colorectal Canada (CCC) coordonne des groupes de soutien dans plusieurs communautés partout au Canada afin d’aider les patients et leurs aidants tout au long de leur parcours avec le cancer.

Options de traitement

Différentes options de traitement s’offrent aux patients selon la taille, le site et le stade de leur cancer colorectal.

Parmi les traitements locaux, on trouve l’intervention chirurgicale, la radiothérapie et les diverses techniques de radiologie interventionnelle. Ces techniques visent l’ablation ou la destruction des cellules cancéreuses dans la région touchée, qu’il s’agisse du côlon, du rectum, du foie, des poumons, du péritoine, etc., et ce, sans perturber les autres parties du corps.

Les traitements systémiques englobent les chimiothérapies et les traitements biologiques, où des agents médicamenteux passent dans le sang, voyageant ainsi dans tout l’organisme, et détruisent les cellules cancéreuses ou en contrôlent la propagation à cette même échelle.

Il est essentiel de bien comprendre les options qui vous sont offertes pour prendre en charge cette maladie. C’est pourquoi Cancer colorectal Canada a conçu un guide détaillé permettant d’en apprendre davantage sur les traitements contre le cancer colorectal. Ceux-ci sont regroupés selon les catégories suivantes :

  • Traitements par intervention chirurgicale
  • Traitements médicamenteux
  • Radiothérapie
  • Radiologie interventionnelle
  • Immunothérapie

On trouve donc dans les sections qui suivent de l’information détaillée sur les façons de traiter le cancer colorectal selon :

  • Le site anatomique de la tumeur
  • Le traitement indiqué
  • Le stade de la maladie

Des agents chimiothérapeutiques aux médicaments biosimilaires

Apprenez les différences entre les agents chimiothérapeutiques, les traitements à petites molécules, les médicaments biologiques et les médicaments biosimilaires, qui jouent un rôle dans la prise en charge du cancer colorectal. Certes, tous s’attaquent aux cellules cancéreuses, mais quelles sont les différences entre chacun d’eux, et à quel moment sont-ils administrés dans le cadre du schéma thérapeutique d’un patient?

Le saviez-vous?

  1. Les agents chimiothérapeutiques agissent plus efficacement sur les tumeurs « précoces », car les mécanismes encadrant la croissance cellulaire sont habituellement encore présents.
  2. Les nouveaux médicaments anticancéreux agissent directement contre les protéines pathogènes dans les cellules cancéreuses; on les appelle « traitements ciblés ». Les agents qui s’attaquent habituellement aux cellules cancéreuses sont appelés « médicaments biologiques ».

Effets secondaires

Pour traiter le cancer colorectal, on peut avoir recours à la chimiothérapie, à un médicament biologique, également appelé traitement ciblé, à la radiothérapie ou à une intervention chirurgicale, ou encore à une combinaison de plusieurs de ces traitements. Ces derniers sont conçus pour tuer ou éradiquer les cellules cancéreuses dans l’organisme; il n’est donc pas surprenant qu’ils endommagent aussi des cellules saines normales non touchées par le cancer, entraînant ainsi des effets secondaires au traitement.

Lorsque les traitements anticancéreux ne font pas de distinction entre les cellules cancéreuses et les cellules saines normales, cela donne lieu à un effet secondaire indésirable.

De nombreux effets secondaires sont normaux et ne présentent aucun danger pour vous, outre un inconvénient mineur, comme des changements dans la croissance des ongles. Il importe de se rappeler que la plupart des effets secondaires ne sont que temporaires et disparaissent quand l’organisme s’ajuste au traitement ou lorsque le traitement est terminé.

Ne vous laissez pas décourager par les effets secondaires engendrés par les traitements contre le cancer colorectal, car des remèdes sont offerts et les symptômes ne sont que de courte durée.


Essais cliniques

Les essais cliniques sont des études visant à évaluer de nouvelles options thérapeutiques contre le cancer. Elles se penchent sur l’innocuité et l’efficacité des traitements. Plus précisément, les essais cliniques peuvent porter sur :

  • Un nouveau médicament anticancéreux
  • Des approches uniques en matière d’interventions chirurgicales et de radiothérapie
  • De nouvelles combinaisons de traitements

Un médicament soumis à l’étude dans le cadre d’un essai clinique est appelé un médicament expérimental. Les essais cliniques se divisent en quatre phases, qui répondent aux questions suivantes :

  • Phase I: Le traitement est-il sécuritaire?
  • Phase II: Le traitement fonctionne-t-il?
  • Phase III: Le traitement est-il meilleur que ce qui est actuellement offert?
  • Phase IV: Qu’a-t-on besoin de savoir de plus?

Il est important de souligner que tous les nouveaux médicaments anticancéreux actuellement offerts pour traiter le cancer colorectal n’étaient, à un moment, accessibles que par l’entremise d’essais cliniques.

Bien que la décision de participer à un essai clinique portant sur un nouveau traitement anticancéreux demeure, en fin de compte, quelque chose de très personnel, le fait de bien comprendre la nature des essais cliniques peut aider les patients à faire le choix qui leur convient.

Le saviez-vous?

  1. Un essai clinique n’est effectué que lorsqu’on a une bonne raison de croire que le traitement à l’étude peut s’avérer meilleur que celui actuellement utilisé.
  2. Tous les nouveaux médicaments anticancéreux actuellement offerts pour traiter le cancer colorectal n’étaient, à un moment, accessibles que par l’entremise d’essais cliniques.


Pour trouver un essai clinique au Canada, rendez-vous sur le site canadiancancertrials.ca


Dernières nouvelles sur les traitements

Les recherches démontrent que l’éducation des patients permet de réduire l’incertitude et le stress ressentis par ces derniers lorsqu’ils ne savent pas à quoi s’attendre au moment où est entrepris leur traitement anticancéreux. L’incertitude étant un facteur de stress bien connu qui agit sur la santé, on peut donc, en la réduisant, améliorer les chances qu’un traitement contre le cancer soit une réussite. Une bonne préparation permet également aux patients atteints d’un cancer et à leurs aidants de s’armer de stratégies pour composer avec cette épreuve, par exemple le fait de surmonter la fatigue qu’amène le traitement en effectuant des ajustements à leur charge de travail et dans leur vie familiale.

Voilà pourquoi Cancer colorectal Canada publie dans sa section « Ressources .» des informations récentes sur les traitements. Ces documents contiennent des renseignements à jour couvrant toutes les facettes thérapeutiques du traitement du cancer colorectal et des essais cliniques effectués dans ce domaine.

La plupart des schémas thérapeutiques contre le cancer colorectal y sont abordés et de l’information récente y est présentée dans un langage accessible. Ces documents offrent des renseignements sur les sujets suivants :

  • Les médicaments et les traitements systémiques
  • Les traitements par intervention chirurgicale
  • La radiothérapie
  • Les traitements interventionnels
  • Le dépistage
  • L’oncologie psychosociale
  • D’autres aspects de ce domaine
  • La nutrition et les saines habitudes de vie

Pour obtenir de l’information récente sur le cancer colorectal, veuillez consulter notre section « Ressources » et sélectionner l’onglet « Dernières nouvelles sur les traitements ».


Médecine naturopathique et cancer colorectal

La prévention, surtout chez les personnes exposées à un risque accru de développer un cancer colorectal, est la première et la plus importante étape dans la lutte au cancer. Bien que le cancer colorectal soit associé à de nombreux facteurs de risque sur lesquels il est impossible d’agir, dont l’âge, des antécédents familiaux de cancer colorectal, la race, l’origine ethnique et des syndromes héréditaires, plusieurs gestes peuvent être posés pour prévenir le développement d’un cancer. Parmi ceux-ci, on retrouve l’adoption de saines habitudes alimentaires, la pratique régulière d’une activité physique, le renoncement au tabac et une consommation d’alcool limitée.

La médecine naturopathique est un aspect important des soins contre le cancer colorectal et offre des traitements qui :

  1. Réduisent le risque initial de développer un cancer colorectal;
  2. Offrent un soutien durant le traitement par chimiothérapie, radiothérapie ou intervention chirurgicale, et permettent d’améliorer la tolérabilité et le taux de réussite des traitements traditionnels;
  3. Aident à prévenir les récidives après que le cancer a été traité avec succès.

Stomie

L’ablation d’une tumeur maligne par intervention chirurgicale est le traitement le plus courant contre le cancer colorectal. La partie touchée du côlon ou du rectum est alors retirée et, dans la plupart des cas, les portions saines sont ensuite rattachées (une intervention souvent appelée anastomose). Parfois, cela n’est pas possible en raison de l’étendue de la maladie ou du site touché; dans de tels cas, une ouverture est alors créée de façon chirurgicale dans l’abdomen pour créer une nouvelle voie d’évacuation des selles. Cette intervention est généralement appelée une stomie. Celle-ci peut être permanente, lorsqu’un organe doit être retiré, ou temporaire, lorsqu’un organe a besoin de temps pour guérir.

Dans le domaine du cancer colorectal, on retrouve deux types de stomies :

  • L’iléostomie - l’abouchement de la partie inférieure de l’intestin grêle (iléon) à la stomie (ouverture). Cela permet de contourner le côlon, le rectum et l’anus.
  • La colostomie - l’abouchement de la portion descendante du côlon à la stomie. Cela permet de contourner le rectum et l’anus.

Une stomie (c’est-à-dire une ouverture) est pratiquée lorsqu’une portion de votre intestin grêle ou de votre gros intestin est abouchée à la surface de l’abdomen (le ventre), créant ainsi une autre voie d’évacuation des selles. Un chirurgien effectue une stomie en faisant sortir de l’abdomen une portion d’un intestin, puis en repliant celle-ci sur elle-même, comme un col roulé, et en la suturant à la paroi abdominale. Une collerette et une poche adhésive pour stomie sont alors fixées à la stomie et portées sur l’abdomen afin de recueillir les selles. Cet appareillage devra être nettoyé au cours de la journée et changé complètement au moins une fois par semaine.

Le saviez-vous?

  1. Une stomie n’est pas toujours permanente. Elle peut être renversée 9 mois après votre intervention chirurgicale colorectale. Parlez-en à votre chirurgien oncologue colorectal.
  2. Les personnes vivant avec une stomie permanente peuvent mener une vie parfaitement satisfaisante et enrichissante!

Une stomie devra être pratiquée chez un certain pourcentage des personnes atteintes du cancer colorectal. C’est avec cela en tête que Cancer colorectal Canada a conçu un guide visant à permettre aux patients de bien comprendre les différents types de stomies et les soins associés à chacun d’eux.

Ce guide vous aidera à mieux comprendre les stomies – que sont-elles, pourquoi sont-elles nécessaires, en quoi influencent-elles le processus digestif normal et quels changements amènent-elles dans la vie d’une personne?

What is colorectal cancer?

What is Colorectal Cancer?

Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in the colon or the rectum. Colon and rectal cancers arise from the same type of cell and have...

Learn More
Treatment

Treatment

Different treatment options are available to patients depending on the size, location and stage of colorectal cancer.

Learn More

Life After Treatment

Remission is when the signs and symptoms of cancer have decreased or disappeared, although cancer may still be in the body. Living in...

Learn More
Healthy living

Healthy Living

Colorectal cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in Canada and 1 in 2 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetime...

Learn More
Screening

Screening

In the majority of cases, colorectal cancer is preventable and yet each year in Canada, thousands of people are diagnosed with advanced...

Learn More
Communicating with your doctor

Physician Directed Questions

Regular communication with your doctor is important in making informed decisions about your health care. Whether you are dealing with...

Learn More

Rencontrez notre comité consultatif médical

Dans ses efforts pour tenir ses membres au courant des dernières percées médicales dans le diagnostic et le traitement du cancer colorectal, CCC profite également des conseils d’un comité consultatif médical composé de spécialistes de cette maladie.

  • Dr Pierre Major, Oncologie médicale, Président - Centre de cancérologie Juravinski, Hamilton, Ont
  • Dr David Armstrong, Gastroentérologie Centre médical de l’Université McMaster, Hamilton, Ont
  • Dr Shady Ashamalla, Oncologie chirurgicale - Centre des sciences de la santé Sunnybrook, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr Gaurav Bahl, Radio-oncologie - Centre de cancérologie de la Nouvelle-Écosse, Halifax, N.-É
  • Dr Oliver Bathe, Oncologie chirurgicale - Université de Calgary, Calgary, Alb
  • Dr Gerald Batist, Oncologie médicale - Hôpital général juif, Montréal, Qc
  • Dre Sylvie Bourque, Oncologie médicale - Centre de cancérologie de la vallée du Fraser, Surrey, C.-B
  • Dr Robin Boushey, Oncologie chirurgicale - Hôpital d’Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont
  • Dre Christine Brezden-Masley, Oncologie médicale - Hôpital St. Michael, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr Ron Bridges, Recherche - Université de Calgary, Calgary, Alb
  • Dre Margot Burnell, Oncologie médicale - Hôpital régional de Saint John, Saint John, N.-B
  • Dr Eric Chen, Oncologie médicale - Hôpital Princess Margaret, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr Zane Cohen, Professeur de chirurgie, Directeur - Hôpital Mount Sinaï, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr Bruce Colwell, Oncologie médicale - Centre des sciences de la santé Queen Elizabeth II, Halifax, N.-É
  • Dre Christine Cripps, Oncologie médicale - Centre de cancérologie de L’Hôpital d’Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont
  • Dr Robert Dinniwell, Radio-oncologie - Hôpital Princess Margaret, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr Sam Elfassy, Gastroentérologie - Centre de la santé St. Joseph, Toronto, Ont
  • Dre Mary Jane Esplen, Oncologie psychosociale - Hôpital général de Toronto, Toronto, Ont
  • Dre Margaret Fitch, Oncologie psychosociale - Centre des sciences de la santé Sunnybrook, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr William Foulkes, Génétique - Hôpital général juif, Montréal, Qc
  • Dr Steven Gallinger, Oncologie chirurgicale - Hôpital Mount Sinaï, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr Carman Giacomantonio, Oncologie chirurgicale - Centre des sciences de la santé Queen Elizabeth II, Halifax, N.-É
  • Dre Sharlene Gill, Oncologie médicale - Agence du cancer de la Colombie-Britannique, Vancouver, C.-B
  • Dr Philip H.Gordon, Oncologie chirurgicale - Hôpital général juif, Montréal, Qc
  • Dr Robert (Bob) Hilsden, Recherche - Institut de recherche sur le cancer du sud de l’Alberta, Calgary, Alb
  • Dr Paul Karanicolas, Oncologie chirurgicale(hépatobiliaire) - Centre des sciences de la santé Sunnybrook, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr Yoo Joung Ko, Oncologie médicale - Centre des sciences de la santé Sunnybrook, Toronto, Ont
  • Dre Monika Krzyzanowska, Oncologie médicale - Hôpital Princess Margaret, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr Calvin Law, Oncologie chirurgicale - Centre des sciences de la santé Sunnybrook, Toronto, Ont
  • Dre Becky Lee, Médecine naturopathique - Centre Marsden, Vaughan, Ont
  • Dr Sender Liberman, Oncologie chirurgicale - Hôpital général de Montréal, Montréal, Qc
  • Dr Eric Marsden, Médecine naturopathique - Centre Marsden, Vaughan, Ont
  • Celestina Martopullo, Oncologie psychosociale - Centre de cancérologie Tom Baker, Calgary, Alb
  • Dre Andrea McCart, Oncologie chirurgicale - Hôpital Mount Sinaï, Toronto, Ont
  • Dre Barb Melosky, Oncologie médicale - Agence du cancer de la Colombie-Britannique, Vancouver, C.-B
  • Dr David Mulder, Chirurgie cardiothoracique - Hôpital général de Montréal, Montréal, Qc
  • Fiona O’Shea, Soins palliatifs - Centre de soins contre le cancer Dr. H. Bliss Murphy, St. John’s, T.-N.-L
  • Dr Terry Phang, Oncologie chirurgicale - Hôpital St. Paul, Vancouver, C.-B
  • Dr Geoff Porter, Oncologie chirurgicale Centre des sciences de la santé Queen Elizabeth II, Halifax, N.-É
  • Dr Daniel Rayson, Oncologie médicale - Centre des sciences de la santé Queen Elizabeth II, Halifax, N.-É
  • Dre Carole Richard, Oncologie chirurgicale - Hôpital Saint-Luc du CHUM, Montréal, Qc
  • Dr Daryl Roitman, Oncologie médicale - Hôpital général de North York, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr Andrew Scarfe, Oncologie médicale - Institut du cancer Cross, Edmonton, Alb
  • Dr Lucas Sideris, Oncologie chirurgicale - Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montréal, Qc
  • Dr Andrew Smith, Oncologie chirurgicale - Centre régional de cancérologie Sunnybrook, Toronto, Ont
  • Dre Jennifer Spratlin, Oncologie médicale - Institut du cancer Cross, Edmonton, Alb
  • Dr John Srigley, Pathologie - Hôpital Credit Valley, Mississauga, Ont
  • Dre Deborah Terespolsky, Génétique - Hôpital Credit Valley, Mississauga, Ont
  • Jean-Luc C. Urbain - Centre médical Lebanon VA, Lebanon, Penns
  • Dr Ramses Wassef, Département de chirurgie, Faculté de médecine - Hôpital Saint-Luc du CHUM, Montréal, Qc
  • Dr Clarence Wong, Gastroentérologie - Hôpital Royal Alexandra, Edmonton, Alb
  • Dre Rebecca K.S. Wong - Hôpital Princess Margaret, Toronto, Ont
  • Dr Huiming Yang, Gastroentérologie - Services de santé de l’Alberta, Calgary, Alb
  • Dr Rami Younan, Oncologie chirurgicale - Hôpital Hôtel-Dieu du CHUM, Montréal, Qc

Rencontrez notre équipe

BARRY D. STEIN
Président
1350, rue Sherbrooke Ouest
Bureau 300
Montréal (Québec) H3G 1J1
barrys@colorectalcancercanada.com
Tél.: (514) 875-7745 ext. 2530
Téléc.: (514) 875-7746


BUNNIE SCHWARTZ
Cofondatrice
4576, rue Yonge, Bureau 605
North York (Ontario) M2N 6N4
bunnies@colorectalcancercanada.com
Tél.: (416) 785-0449 ext. 2623
Téléc.: (416) 785-0450


CATHIE JACKSON
Directrice des opérations
1350,rue Sherbrooke Ouest
Bureau 300
Montréal (Québec) H3G 1J1
cathiej@colorectalcancercanada.com
Tél.: (514) 875-7745 ext.2524
Téléc.: (514) 875-7746


FRANK PITMAN
Soutien aux patients et aux bénévoles
1350, rue Sherbrooke Ouest
Bureau 300
Montréal (Québec) H3G 1J1
frankp@colorectalcancercanada.com
Tél.: (514) 875-7745 ext. 2529
Téléc.: (514) 875-7746

FILOMENA SERVIDIO-ITALIANO
Directrice de l'information clinique et de l'éducation
4576, rue Yonge, Bureau 605
North York (Ontario) M2N 6N4
filomenas@colorectalcancercanada.com
Tél.: (416) 785-0449 ext. 2632
Téléc.: (416) 785-0450


ANNE-MARIE MYERS
Coordonnatrice de l'information clinique et de l'élaboration des programmes
1350, rue Sherbrooke Ouest
Bureau 300
Montréal (Québec) H3G 1J1
annemariem@colorectalcancercanada.com
Tél.: (514) 875-7745 ext. 2537
Téléc.: (514) 875-7746


ZOE MANDELOS
Adjointe administrative
1350, rue Sherbrooke Ouest
Bureau 300
Montréal (Québec) H3G 1J1
zoem@colorectalcancercanada.com
Tél.: (514) 875-7745 ext. 2527
Téléc.: (514) 875-7746


Rencontrez les membres de notre conseil d'administration

Cancer colorectal Canada est un organisme dirigé par un conseil d’administration bénévole. Parmi les membres de notre conseil figurent des patients atteints d’un cancer colorectal et des professionnels du milieu. Tous résident au Canada.

  • Barry D. Stein - Président-Directeur général, Montréal, QC
  • Craig Langpap - Président et trésorier, Victoria, C.-B.
  • Garry Sears - Secrétaire, Ottawa, Ont
  • Sarita Benchimol - Membre, Montréal, QC
  • Amy Elmaleh - Membre, Toronto, Ont
  • Hyla Goldstein - Membre, Toronto, Ont
  • Martin Gosselin - Membre, Montréal, QC
  • Paul Greenberg - Membre, Toronto, Ont
  • Michael Kalmar - Membre, Toronto, Ont
  • Melvin Mogil - Membre, Toronto, Ont
  • Alan Peters - Membre, Toronto, Ont
  • Todd Shute - Membre, Toronto, Ont

Qui sommes-nous

Le 1er juillet 2017, l’Association canadienne du cancer colorectal et Cancer du côlon Canada fusionnaient leurs activités pour former Cancer colorectal Canada (CCC), qui devenait ainsi le mieux connu et le plus important organisme sans but lucratif se consacrant à l’amélioration de la qualité de vie des patients, ainsi qu’à la sensibilisation et à l’éducation de la population concernant la prévention et le traitement de cette maladie mortelle.


Notre mission

Le plus important organisme sans but lucratif de soutien aux patients dans le domaine du cancer colorectal au pays, Cancer colorectal Canada se consacre à sensibiliser et à éduquer la population sur le cancer colorectal, à soutenir les patients et leurs familles ainsi qu’à défendre les intérêts des personnes touchées par cette maladie.


Notre vision

Nous imaginons un monde où un dépistage et une détection précoces se traduiront par un taux de survie de 100 % chez les patients atteints d’un cancer colorectal.

What is colorectal cancer?

What is Anal Cancer?

Anal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the anus. Following a diagnosis, tests are performed....

Learn More
What is colorectal cancer?

Risk Factors and Symptoms

There are several factors which may increase the risk of developing the most common type anal cancer – squamous cell anal cancer. These...

Learn More
What is colorectal cancer?

Diagnosis

Tests that examine the rectum and anus are used to detect and diagnose anal cancer. The following procedures may be used...

Learn More
What is colorectal cancer?

Treatment Anal Cancer

Different treatment options exist for patients with anal cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are...

Learn More
What is colorectal cancer?

What is Colorectal Cancer?

Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in the colon or the rectum. Colon and rectal cancers arise from the same type of cell and have...

Learn More
Treatment

Treatment

Different treatment options are available to patients depending on the size, location and stage of colorectal cancer.

Learn More

Life After Treatment

Remission is when the signs and symptoms of cancer have decreased or disappeared, although cancer may still be in the body. Living in...

Learn More
Healthy living

Healthy Living

Colorectal cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in Canada and 1 in 2 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetime...

Learn More
Screening

Screening

In the majority of cases, colorectal cancer is preventable and yet each year in Canada, thousands of people are diagnosed with advanced...

Learn More
Communicating with your doctor

Physician Directed Questions

Regular communication with your doctor is important in making informed decisions about your health care. Whether you are dealing with...

Learn More

Colorectal Cancer Canada has compiled an online glossary of colorectal cancer-related terms to help you familiarize yourself with the language used on this site or used by your doctor.  The Glossary is designed to help promote awareness and facilitate your understanding of the disease as much as possible.

Advocacy 101

Advocacy is telling your story to a decision-maker, through various means, with the express purpose of compelling that person to do (or not to do) something. It is a process that normally takes time to realize tangible results, and there is no one way to go about advocating.

Advocacy is also grounded in two fundamental components:

  • Your ability to tell your personal story – it is personal to your own style and comfort level.
  • Establishing and fostering mutually beneficial relationships with those who have the ability to effect change.

Finally, advocacy is empowerment – exerting some form of control or initiating some form of action around an issue that matters to you.


Creating an Effective Advocacy Plan

While individuals can create their own advocacy plan, most often the organization representing their cause (e.g., Colorectal Cancer Canada) has spent time developing an advocacy strategy with the following three components, which individuals can play a role in.

  • Step 1 – Key Message Development: Decide what issues you want to advocate for, and then craft corresponding key messages to support your position.  This requires you to take an array of information and distill it down to its simplest form.
  • Step 2 – Advocacy Tools: Next, decide the means by which your key messages will be delivered to decision-makers.  These are your communication tools and they represent the core of any effective advocacy plan.  Anything you can use to communicate with people is a potential tool.
  • Examples of advocacy tools include:
  • Website
  • Newsletter
  • In-person meeting
  • Telephone call
  • Letter / fax / e-mail
  • Petition
  • Postcard campaign
  • Brochureé
  • Fact sheet
  • Advocacy Day
  • Information session
  • E-advocacy
  • Step 3 – Your One ‘Ask’: This is the goal of any advocacy plan, to be able to ask a decision-maker for the one thing you need them to do, not a list of what you want from them. Your ‘ask’ needs to be tangible, something that can be measured.  Asking someone for their support is akin to an empty promise; it won’t ever amount to much unless you outline what exactly you want them to do to demonstrate their support for your issues.

Meeting With Decision Makers

Initially, you may need to determine who your local federal Member of Parliament (MP) or provincial representative is (MPP, MNA, MLA, or MHA depending on which province you are in).  The person you need to meet with will be determined by the issue you face.  In health care, it’s likely your provincial member.  In that case, you can find your provincial representative on the Internet.

Of all of the tools you may choose to use in support of your advocacy efforts, one of the most effective is an in-person meeting with a decision maker (in the case of government, an elected representative or civil servant).  There is really no substitute for sitting down face-to-face. When presented in a clear, compelling, consistent manner, your key messages can go a long way to building a good working relationship and achieving your one ‘ask.’  But the real secret to success in advocacy is not giving up.  So keep meeting and communicating with your elected official until you’ve achieved what you need.


Developing and Telling Your Story

As you’re preparing to advocate, take the time to craft your personal story.  Write it out if you can, or get help to put it down on paper.  Whether you are a cancer survivor, caregiver, family member or friend, you have a unique story to tell about the issues and challenges faced from your perspective.  Make sure you capture those thoughts and feelings.  It will be fundamental to your advocacy activities.

Whether you’re meeting with a decision maker in person or writing them a letter, you should always take a moment to tell them your personal story or experience.  It is what connects you to the listener and humanizes the issues you’re bringing forward.

To learn more about how to develop your personal story, please review Telling Your Personal Story: A How-To Guide.


Advocacy and The Media

Sharing your story with the media – newspapers, radio, television and the Internet – can be a powerful way to advocate for change or action on an issue.  In advocacy, it is important to remember that proactively speaking to the media should be only considered after you have engaged with your elected official and given them the chance to help you.  Communicating through the media takes your issue from being private to being public and can educate a broader audience on the issue as a way to gather more support.  This can put pressure on the government, who care greatly what their constituents believe.

For this reason, engaging media in advocacy efforts is a serious step that should only be considered after exhausting all other avenues and consulting with Colorectal Cancer Canada. We are here to help!


Social Media and Advocacy

Social media has become an integral part of many peoples’ everyday lives and like traditional media (print and broadcast), it can be a powerful tool in advocacy. Social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube can help you raise awareness about your issue among a broader group of people.

In its simplest form, social media makes it easy for people to discover, read and share news and information.  By advocating about your issue through social media, everyday people can engage with and comment on information you share in ways that are not possible through traditional media. Importantly, elected officials pay attention to what is being shared on social media – especially on Twitter – but it’s important to use these tools wisely and at the right time.

So as a patient, caregiver, family member or friend of someone with colorectal cancer, this means more than ever before you have the opportunity to have a voice and have it heard by many people.  The more contacts you make or followers you attract through social media can increase the volume of your voice, so it is heard by the right people.

Start by following us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn and contact us if you have any questions about social media in advocacy.

Different treatment options exist for patients with anal cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. Clinical trials investigate how to improve current treatments and provide information on novel treatment options for cancer patients. For more information on clinical trials, please consult your doctor.

Three standard methods of treatment are used:

  • Radiation therapy - uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells. Two types of radiation therapy exist. External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to direct radiation towards the tumour. Internal radiation therapy uses radioactive material sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters. This is then placed inside the body, either directly into or near the tumour. The dosage of radiation given during treatment, and when and how it is given, will depend on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.
  • Chemotherapy - uses anti-cancer (cytotoxic) drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping cell division. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream, circulate throughout the body, and destroy cancer cells, including those that may have broken away from the primary tumour (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy). The type and dosage of chemotherapy given during treatment, and when and how it is given, will depend on the type and stage of the cancer being treated.
  • Surgery - Local resection removes the tumour from the anus along a small margin of healthy tissue around the tumour. This surgical procedure may be used if the cancer is small and has not spread. In addition, it may preserve the sphincter muscles so the patient can still control bowel movements. Tumours that form in the lower part of the anus can often be removed with local resection.

Abdominoperineal resection is removal of the anus, rectum, and part of the sigmoid colon through an incision made in the abdomen. Lymph nodes that contain cancer may also be removed during this operation. When these organs are removed, the surgeon creates a new opening (stoma) on the surface of the abdomen so that solid wastes can be collected in a disposable bag outside of the body. This is called a colostomy.

Source:

National Cancer Institute

Resection of the colon with colostomy. Image courtesy of the National Cancer Institute

About

An astounding 40 feet in length and eight feet high, The Giant Colon is a multimedia exhibition for all ages that features all of the pathologies that may be found inside the human colon, including colorectal cancer. The Giant Colon exhibit was launched during Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month in March 2009 and tours the country on a regular basis.

The exhibit is animated by the CCC’s professor in residence, Dr. Preventino. Captured on 5 video displays, Dr. Preventino will guide you on your tour through the Giant Colon and provide healthy lifestyle tips to keep you and your colon healthy.


Rent the Giant Colon

Colorectal Cancer Canada (CCC) is pleased to offer organizations across Canada a unique opportunity to inform the public about colorectal cancer and the other diseases of the human colon by bringing The Giant Colon exhibit to their region.

To rent the Giant Colon Exhibit please feel free to contact us at our toll free number 1-877-50-COLON (26566) Ext. 2529 or via email at giantcolontour@colorectalcancercanada.com

No Butts About It. We Are Stronger Together!

CCC offers a variety of projects in which volunteers can get involved:

  • Development (fundraising and helping with events across Canada)
  • Support groups (helping to support an existing group or starting up a new group in an unserved community)
  • Advocacy (supporting our campaign for a national screening policy and improving access to the last treatments)
  • Lending a hand with administrative projects in the Montreal office
  • Participating as a volunteer when the Giant Colon Tour comes to your city

Colorectal Cancer Canada hosts various fundraising events throughout the year which aim to increase awareness of key issues as well as support the goals of the organization. CCC depends on the generosity of its donors and sponsors in order to implement its projects.


Dress in Blue Day

The first Friday of March is Dress in Blue day, a campaign to raise awareness during Colorectal Cancer Month and part of an international movement to reach out to the thousands of families touched by the disease.

People dress in blue to show support and raise funds for the disease.


Annual Gala

Each year Colorectal Cancer Canada (CCC) hosts a major fundraising gala that celebrates the outstanding work of CCC. This event enables us to carry out life-saving programs and helps patients across the country.

This year’s event takes place Thursday March 22nd, 2018 and will be a pleasure for the senses. From the sights of Salon 1861 to the sounds of live music to the aromas of our very own spice market, the event will be like no other. The evening will begin with a VIP cocktail followed by wine and food tastings at stations hosted by local restaurants. Food will be paired with renowned vintages for an unforgettable culinary experience.

Please join us in making the 8th Annual Gala a night our guests will revere.

For information regarding the event and sponsorship opportunities, please click here


Push For Your Tush

Held annually, Push For Your Tush, is a fun, family friendly day where survivors are celebrated and the departed are remembered and honoured.

As Canada’s largest colorectal cancer event, Push For Your Tush has grown into a national walk/run across 11 communities raising over $5.4 million to date. Funds raised continue to support research, education, awareness and patient care.

To learn more contact Cathie Jackson


Bum Run

The Bum Run is a unique 5km walk/run through downtown Toronto which takes place the last Sunday of April. It was founded by Dr. Ian Bookman, a gastroenterologist in Toronto, with the goal of raising awareness about how colorectal cancer screening can prevent the 95% of cancer deaths.

All funds raised by participants go directly to CCC’s awareness and patient support programs.

Join us at our next regularly scheduled BUM RUN so that you too can make a difference.


Kick Ass Golf Tournament

The Kick Ass Golf Tournament will take place on July 12, 2018 at Lebovic Gold Club located in Aurora, ON.


Decembeard

Take the decembeard challenge!

During the month of December, get sponsored to grow a beard. If you already have a beautiful bushy beard, why not decorate it - did someone say human Christmas tree?

Alone or in a team, men and women can participate in this challenge! Can’t grow a beard? Just put on a fake one or paint one on. We can’t wait to see what you come up with.

The money you help raise goes towards funding Colorectal Cancer Canada’s educational and support programs.

Ongoing Efforts

Although we’ve accomplished a great deal over the years, the fact remains that while colorectal cancer (CRC) is preventable, it continues to be the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Canada. Moreover, we are faced with new challenges, such as rising rates of CRC in young adults and keeping abreast of advancements in research and development.

Our various initiatives allow CCC to continue to advocate for the well-being of CRC patients and those at risk:

  • Foods that Fight Cancer Program(FTFC) allows Canadians to incorporate healthy, nutritional and fun choices into their daily diets. It can furnish Canadians with recipes that will assist them in making the right food choices in helping them to prevent colorectal cancer and other cancers as well. The anti-cancer properties contained in the recipes have the additional benefit of increasing the chances of surviving cancer in the long run.
  • Patient Values Project in Health Technology Assessment will allow Colorectal Cancer Canada and other cancer patient groups in Canada and abroad to better capture the patient perspective when a cancer drug comes under review by a health technology assessment (HTA) authority. The Project aims to define, measure and weigh patient values and preferences and then have those values/preferences incorporated into the HTA patient group submission.
  • Patient Group Pathway Model to Accessing Cancer Clinical Trials is a Colorectal Cancer Canada (CCC) initiative which aims to increase recruitment, participation and retention rates of cancer clinical trials within Canada. A consensus meeting and working group meeting were hosted by CCC in 2017 and recommendations on increasing uptake have been issued and due to be published in Current Oncology in 2018.
  • Real World Evidence (RWE) is the third component to our patient-centric national “Trilogy” initiative. It focuses on the ability to collect data from clinical trials so that the best treatment paths can be uncovered for patients in clinical practice. CCC will be dedicating a conference to RWE to continue to capture the patient perspective across the continuum of colorectal cancer care.
  • The Get Personal campaign promotes awareness and education for the need to get genetically tested as soon as a stage IV colorectal cancer patient is diagnosed with the disease. Identification of biomarker status is important in properly managing advanced disease. More importantly, identifying a patient’s genetic status will ensure a personalized approach to their care and treatmentof their disease.
  • Jason Fund Program : In recognition of the unique challenges experienced by young adults afflicted with cancer between the ages of 16 to 30 years old, the Jason Fund is there to lend a helping hand. The Jason Fund promotes not only awareness of cancer in youths but a support network among and for youths with cancer in the form of social and financial services, patient support groups and it strives to promote excellence in the treatment and management of the disease in our society’s youth.
  • The Never Too Young (N2Y) Campaign brings much-needed awareness and education to the forefront when it comes to young-onset colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is on the rise in young people and we’re committed to learning more and providing support for those currently in their fight.
  • The Wendy Bear Patient Assistance Program is named in memory of the wife of hockey legend Darryl Sittler, a long-time supporter of our charity. Wendy was instrumental in assisting with raising awareness and funds for Colon Cancer Canada before her passing in 2002. She wanted to ensure that anyone diagnosed with colorectal cancer would have the necessary supports to help them manage their life with this disease. It is in her memory that the Wendy Bear was created with 100% of the proceeds from the sale of the bear going directly to support palliative care patients in need.

What We’ve Done So Far

Since its inception, Colorectal Cancer Canada has made important strides in improving the lives of patients and advancing screening and access to treatment options. Colorectal Cancer Canada has hosted a number of scientific conferences, roundtables, and consensus meetings. Key opinion leaders from within Canada and from around the world have come together to generate consensus statements and produced practice guidelines to improve the care and management of colorectal cancer patients. Through various partnerships, meetings with key federal and provincial decision makers, as well as nationwide advertising, public relations and fundraising campaigns, our organization has been instrumental in:

  • Increasing Canadians’ understanding of colorectal cancer;
  • Reducing drug approval delays at Health Canada;
  • Assisting in equal approval and access to many specific targeted therapies and treatments across Canada;
  • Introducing Provincial and Territorial Colorectal Cancer Screening Programs:
  • Leading decision in reimbursement of out of country healthcare,
  • Introducing clinical guidelines,
  • Promoting introduction of clinical trials for numerous treatments like Hepatic Arterial Infusion Pump (HAIP), Chemotherapy and Hyperthermic Intra-peritoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) as well as assisting in the development ofnational guidelines for the use of Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) in the management colon cancer.
  • Publishing a Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Registries Proposal in Canada which brought national awareness to the need for developing and maintaining hereditary colorectal cancer registries in Canada.

Fighting For A Cause

Colorectal Cancer Canada (CCC) is a patient based organization composed of colorectal cancer patients and caregivers that understand the needs of patients and the challenges of coping with the disease. The organization strives to promote colorectal cancer awareness and education, provides support to patients and their families and advocates on their behalf. CCC is also engaged in broader national and provincial health policy issues that touch all cancer patients, such as: Patient Values and Preferences in Health Technology Assessment, Cancer Clinical Trials and Real World Evidence.

CCC has three major goals for its advocacy efforts:

  • Promoting population-based colorectal cancer screening programs in all provinces and territories;
  • Cancer prevention through the promotion of healthy lifestyles; and
  • Equal and timely access to effective treatments to improve patient outcomes.

With these goals, we believe we can prevent colorectal cancer, prolong the lives of those touched by the disease and reduce mortality from it.


Why Does Advocacy Matter?

Advocacy matters because the squeaky wheel gets the grease. But advocacy also matters because the alternative, not doing anything, is really no alternative at all. Inaction has never led to change or progress.

Advocacy can be impactful because:

  • Decision makers react to those credible groups or individuals who most effectively bring their issues to the forefront of the public agenda.
  • In the case of advocating to government, they have competing interests and concerns that can only be fully discerned when people make their voices heard.

As voters and taxpayers, we all have the ability to effect change.

Tests that examine the rectum and anus are used to detect and diagnose anal cancer. The following procedures may be used:

  • Medical history and physical examination: a healthcare professional will take a history of the patient’s health habits, present symptoms, and past illnesses and treatments. In addition, an exam of the body will be performed. The doctor will check general signs of health, including signs of disease, such as lumps or anything else that seems unusual.
  • Digital rectal examination (DRE): an exam of the anus and rectum. The doctor or nurse inserts a lubricated, gloved finger into the lower part of the rectum to feel for lumps or anything else that seems unusual.
  • Anoscopy: an exam of the anus and lower rectum using a short, illuminated tube (an anoscope).
  • Proctoscopy: an exam of the rectum using a short, illuminated tube with a camera (a proctoscope).
  • Endo-anal or endorectal ultrasound: a procedure in which an ultrasound probe (transducer) is inserted into the anus or rectum. High-energy sound waves bounce off internal tissues or organs and make echoes. These echoes form images of bodily structures called a sonogram.
  • Biopsy: tissues or cells are removed from the body so they can be viewed under a microscope by a pathologist to check for signs of cancer. If an abnormality is observed during an anoscopy, a biopsy may be performed at this time.
  • Anal Pap: Similar to a Pap test, anal cytology, or an anal pap, looks for abnormal cells in the anal lining. This test may help find anal cancer at the earliest, most treatable stages.
Digital rectal exam (DRE). Image courtesy of the National Cancer Institute
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/anal/Patient/page1

Risk Factors:

There are several factors which may increase the risk of developing the most common type anal cancer – squamous cell anal cancer. These include the following:

  • Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Having multiple sexual partners
  • Having receptive anal intercourse (anal sex)
  • Smoking cigarettes
  • Frequent anal redness, swelling, and soreness
  • Having anal fistulas (abnormal openings)
  • Lowered Immunity (i.e. people living with HIV, organ transplants, immunosuppressive drugs)

Symptoms:

The signs and symptoms of anal cancer included below can also be caused by other health conditions. It is important to have these symptoms, and any other unusual symptoms, checked by a doctor. Signs and symptoms of anal cancer include:

  • Anal or rectal bleeding
  • Pain or pressure in the anal area
  • Itching or discharge from the anus
  • A lump or swelling in the anal area
  • A change in bowel habits (changes in the size of stool, or constipation, diarrhea or alternating between constipation and diarrhea)

Anal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the anus. Following a diagnosis, tests are performed to determine if cancer cells have spread within the anus or to other parts of the body.

At first, the changes in a cell are abnormal, not cancerous. Researchers believe, however, that some of these abnormal changes are the first step in a series of slow changes that can lead to cancer. Some of the abnormal cells go away without treatment, but others can become cancerous. This phase of the disease is called dysplasia (an abnormal growth of cells). Dysplasia in the anus is called anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) or anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs). Growths—such as polyps or warts—that are not cancerous can also occur in or around the anus; some may become cancerous over time. In some cases, the precancerous tissue needs to be removed to keep cancer from developing. The anus is made up of different types of cells, and each type can become cancerous.

There are several different types of anal cancer based on the type of cell where the cancer began:

  • Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of anal cancer. This cancer begins in the outer lining of the anal canal.
  • Cloacogenic carcinoma accounts for about one-quarter of all anal cancers. This type of cancer arises between the outer part of the anus and the lower part of the rectum. Cloacogenic cell cancer likely starts from cells that are similar to squamous cell cancer, and it is treated similarly.
  • Adenocarcinoma arises from the glands that make mucous located under the anal lining.
  • Basal cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer that can appear in the perianal (around the anus) skin.
  • Melanoma begins in cells that produce pigment (color), found in the skin or anal lining.
  • Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are rare anal cancers that are much more commonly found in the stomach or small intestine. When these are found at an early stage, they are removed with surgery. If they have spread beyond the anus, they can be treated with drug therapy.

Staging Anal Cancer

Staging describes the extent of the cancer based on how much of the anus is affected, and if there is spread to other organs. It is important to know the stage of the disease in order to plan the most appropriate treatment.

The following are used for the staging of squamous cell anal cancer:

  • Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) - abnormal cells are found in the innermost lining of the anus. These abnormal cells may become cancer cells and spread into nearby normal tissue.
  • Stage I - cancer has formed. Tumour is 2 centimeters or smaller in size.
  • Stage II  - tumour is larger than 2 centimeters.
  • Stage IIIA - tumour can be any size, and has spread to either the lymph nodes near the rectum, or into nearby organs, such as the vagina, urethra, and bladder.
  • Stage IIIB - tumour can be any size, and has spread 1) into nearby organs and to lymph nodes near the rectum, or 2) to lymph nodes on one side of the pelvis and/or groin, and may have spread to nearby organs, or 3) to lymph nodes near the rectum and in the groin, and/or to lymph nodes on both sides of the pelvis and/or groin, and may have spread into nearby organs.
  • Stage IV - tumour can be any size and cancer may have spread to lymph nodes or nearby organs, and has spread to more distant organs or tissues.

Regular communication with your doctor is important in making informed decisions about your health care. Whether you are dealing with a suspicion, diagnosis or coping with the side effects of chemotherapy, it is important to know what questions to ask your doctor so as to best equip yourself in the prevention, management and treatment of the disease. The more information you have about colorectal cancer, the easier it will be to make important, informed decisions.

Colorectal Cancer Canada has designed a comprehensive list of questions for patients to ask their treating physician according to the set of circumstances in which the patient finds himself as well as the modality of treatment sought.


Questions To Ask Your Doctor About Colorectal Cancer Screening

  • Based on my family and medical history, do I have any of the risk factors that would make me likely to develop colorectal cancer?
  • Are my children or other relatives at higher risk for colorectal cancer?
  • If I have any of the risk factors, are there any changes I can make to place me at less risk?
  • What are the signs and symptoms that I should be aware of?
  • Should I have any of the tests that would screen me for colorectal cancer?
  • If so, what screening test(s) do you recommend for me?
  • How do I prepare for these tests? Do I need to change my diet or my usual medication schedule?
  • What is involved in the test? Will it be uncomfortable or painful? Is there any risk involved?
  • When and from whom will I obtain my results?
  • If I am to have a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, who will do the exam?
  • Will I require someone with me on the day of the exam?
  • How often will I be requiring a colonoscopy?

Questions To Ask Your Doctor About Suspicion of Colorectal Cancer

  • What makes you suspect that I have colorectal cancer?
  • What other medical conditions might be causing my symptoms?
  • What are the common risk factors for colorectal cancer?
  • Am I at increased risk for the disease? Why or why not?
  • What types of examinations and diagnostic tests are performed to diagnose cancer of the colon or rectum?
  • What do these tests involve?
  • How should I prepare for these colorectal cancer tests?
  • Instructions:
  • Will I be able to drive myself home after my test(s) or will I require someone to drive me?
  • Will I require any special assistance at home after undergoing these diagnostic procedures?
  • Should I call for my test results or will someone contact me?
  • Date to Call:
  • Telephone Number to Call:

Questions To Ask Your Doctor Upon Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer

  • What type of colon cancer do I have?
  • What stage is my cancer?
  • What is my prognosis?
  • What doctors do you recommend?
  • Will you permit me to audio-tape our consultations?
  • What type of colon cancer do I have?
  • Where exactly is the cancer located in the colon?
  • Are you able to tell me if my cancer has spread beyond my colon?
  • Are you able to tell me the stage of my cancer?
  • If not, what are the tests that I will require to determine what stage my cancer is in?
  • Are there other tests that need to be done before we can decide on treatment?
  • Are you able to tell me how quickly the cancer is likely to grow?
  • Will it make a difference if I were to change my diet?
  • Does my diagnosis mean that my blood relatives are at higher risk for colorectal cancer? Should they talk to their doctors about screening?
  • What are my treatment options based on my diagnosis?
  • What treatment option do you recommend? Why?
  • What is my prognosis based on type and possible stage of colorectal cancer?
  • What other doctors will I be required to see for the treatment of my disease? Should I see a surgeon? Medical oncologist? Radiation oncologist? Should these doctors be involved in planning my treatment before we begin?
  • Specialists:
  • How do I contact the members of my health care team?
  • Telephone Numbers to Call:
  • Am I a candidate for surgical removal of the colorectal tumour? If so, what type of surgical procedure do you recommend?
  • If so, should I have surgery by a certain date?
  • Should I obtain a second medical opinion before beginning cancer treatment? Why or why not?

A larger more comprehensive list of questions related to the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is available here


Questions on Securing a Second Opinion

Some patients may find it difficult to tell their doctors that they would like to seek out a second opinion. Knowing that it is quite common for patients to seek out a second opinion may help in the pursuit of that second opinion. And most doctors are comfortable with the request. If you are uncertain as to how to begin, the following list of questions may aid in addressing the subject with your doctor:

  • Before we start treatment, I would like to get a second opinion. Will you assist me with that?
  • If you had my type of cancer, who would you see for a second opinion?
  • I think I would like to speak to another doctor to be sure I have all my bases covered.
  • I’m thinking of seeking out a second opinion. Can you recommend someone? If so, who would you recommend and why?

Checklist of Documents to Keep Copies of

At some point, even if you do not change doctors before or during treatment, you may find yourself in the office of a new doctor involved in the treatment or management of your disease. It is important that you be able to give your new doctor the exact details of your diagnosis and treatment. The following checklist will aid in the sharing of your information with the new doctor and it is recommended that you always keep copies for yourself:

  • A copy of the pathology report from any biopsy or surgery
  • If you have had surgery, a copy of the surgical report
  • If you have been admitted to hospital, a copy of the discharge summary that every doctor must prepare when patients are sent home
  • If you have had radiation therapy, a final summary of the dose and field
  • Since some drugs can have long terms side effects, a list of all your drugs, drug doses, and when you took them (including over-the-counter drugs)

About Screening

In the majority of cases, colorectal cancer is preventable and yet each year in Canada, thousands of people are diagnosed with advanced colorectal cancer. If, however, the cancer is detected early through screening, not only may it be highly treatable, but potentially curable. The majority of colorectal cancers begin as benign growths in the lining of the large intestine wall called adenomatous polyps. Over the years (between five and ten years), these polyps grow in size and number, thereby, increasing the risk that the cells in the polyps will become cancerous and invade the wall and move on to other organs. Approximately two thirds of these cancers are found in the large intestine and one third in the rectum. Early removal of these growths will prevent colorectal cancer from developing in the first place. Hence, identification and removal of polyps are key to preventing the development of colorectal cancer.

Clearly, being screened as part of a regular physical exam has the potential to save lives; and patients who are experiencing symptoms related to colorectal cancer should not delay accessing a screening test nor should patients who are at higher risk of developing the cancer.

Did you know?

  1. Most colorectal cancer deaths could be avoided if everyone aged 50 years and older underwent regular screening tests.
  2. It is a common misconception that colorectal cancer is a disease that primarily strikes men. It strikes women almost equally.
  3. More than 90% of the time, colorectal cancer can be effectively treated when diagnosed at its earliest stage through colonoscopy screening.

Sources:

https://basicmedicalkey.com/large-intestine/

https://www.atlantagastro.com/content/colon-cancer-screening

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1411669/pdf/gut00655-0062.pdf

http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/colorectal/statistics/?region=on


Types of Screening Tests

According to the Canadian Cancer Society, screening or testing, should be performed while the patient is feeling well – so as to find any abnormalities early, before signs and symptoms of disease occur.

The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC) has issued the following screening recommendations for adults aged > 50 years who are not at high risk for colorectal cancer. They do not apply to those with previous colorectal cancer or polyps, inflammatory bowel disease, signs or symptoms of colorectal cancer, history of colorectal cancer in one or more first degree relatives, or adults with hereditary syndromes predisposing to colorectal cancer (e.g. Lynch Syndrome).

There are several tests used to screen for colorectal cancer and polyps:

  1. Guaiac Fecal Occult Blood Test (gFOBT): A test in which a stool sample may be collected which is returned to the doctor or lab to test for occult (hidden) blood.
  2. Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT or iFOBT): Uses antibodies to detect human hemoglobin protein in stool. Much like the gFOBT, the test detects the presence of blood in the stools and may be more accurate.
  3. Flexible Sigmoidoscopy: A thin, flexible, lighted with a small video camera located at its end is inserted through the anus in order to view the inside of the lower colon and rectum (usually about the lower 2 feet) for polyps and cancers.
  4. Colonoscopy: A thin, flexible, lighted with a small video camera located at its end is inserted through the anus in order to view the inside of the lower colon and rectum (usually about the lower 2 feet) for polyps and cancers.
  5. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy): A less invasive test using special x-ray equipment to produce pictures of the colon and rectum.
  6. Stool DNA Test or Fecal DNA Testing: Much like the FOBT and FIT, the stool DNA test screens a stool sample but instead of looking for blood, it looks for DNA that may signal the presence of cancer or polyp in the colon.

Screening Guidelines in Canada

While various organizations, including CCC, work to increase the number of individuals getting screened appropriately and to promote high quality cancer screening services across the country, in Canada each province/territory is responsible for establishing its own screening guidelines for colorectal cancer. These guidelines pertain to individuals in the following three categories: asymptomatic, average risk and high risk.

A list of colorectal cancer screening resources for each province and territory can be found here.

In addition, The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC), established by the Public Health Agency of Canada, published national clinical practice guideline recommendations for colorectal cancer screening in 2016. They recommend individuals at average risk, aged 50-74, screen for colorectal cancer with an FOBT [either fecal test guaiac (FTg) or FIT] every 2 years or flexible sigmoidoscopy every 10 years.

Additionally, the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care does not recommend the following:

  • Screening individuals aged 75 and over for colorectal cancer
  • Using colonoscopy as a screening test for colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in Canada and approximately 26,800 Canadians have been diagnosed with the disease in 2017. Your lifetyle plays an important role in your risk on developing colorectal cancer. In fact, according to the World Cancer Research Fund there is strong evidence that being physically active, adopting healthy eating and drinking habits, not smoking and maintaining a healthy body weight can decrease the risk of developing cancer.

You have the power to act and reduce your risk of developing colorectal cancer. Let us help you with useful cancer prevention tips on :


Healthy Eating

con-healthyLiving_full

Enjoy more fruits and vegetables

Statistics show that more than half of all Canadians eat less than 5 servings of fruits and vegetables each day. This is unfortunate knowing that they are packed with vitamins, minerals, fiber and many phytochemical compounds that have anticancer proprieties. Since all fruits and vegetables provide different benefits, the key is to eat a variety of different fruits and vegetables. As a bonus, they will all certainly add a lot of color and textures to your meals!

Did you know?

  1. Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and brussels sprouts contain exceptional sources of anticancer molecules. Eating them on a regular basis can lower your risk of colorectal cancer by 20%.
  2. Berries are an excellent source of polyphenols that have great anticancer potential. Why not enjoy them as a snack?
  3. Citrus fruits like grapefruits, oranges and mandarins are packed with vitamins and they also have the ability to enhance the anticancer potential of other phytochemical compounds in your diet. It is preferable to consume the whole fruit instead of only the juice for less sugar and more fiber.

Tips

  • At the grocery store, spend more time in the fresh fruits and vegetable section and try new ones.
  • Add fruits to your breakfast cereals or yogurt (berries, pears, peaches…).
  • Add a handful of spinach or kale to a fruit smoothie.
  • Add frozen or dried fruits to your muffin recipes.
  • End your lunch with a fresh fruit salad.
  • Prepare veggies and fruits in the refrigerator, make them appealing and ready to eat. Bring them at work!
  • Keep some vegetables in your freezer so you never run out of them.
  • Start dinner with a salad of dark greens and colorful veggies or a vegetable soup.
  • Fill half your plate with vegetables at dinner.
  • Vary the ways that you prepare your vegetables, for example, try roasted asparagus and bell peppers in the oven, prepare mushrooms and bok choy in a wok, add lemon juice and coriander to your avocado, enjoy carrots with a Greek yogurt dip).

Reduce red meat and processed meat consumption

Research has made it clear, read meat (beef, lamb and pork) should be consumed in moderation (less than 500g/week) to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. Vary your menu by using leaner meats like chicken and incorporate other good protein sources such as fish, eggs and legumes.

As for processed meat such as sausages, ham, bacon it is important to limit your consumption as they have clearly been linked to a higher risk of colorectal cancer.

Did you know?

  1. High consumption of red meat and processed meat increases your risk of developing colorectal cancer by 30%.
  2. Grilling meat on the BBQ produces toxic compounds called aromatic hydrocarbons that stick to the meat’s surface and can act as carcinogens (cancer-causing compounds).
  3. Fish like salmon and sardines contain Omega 3 fatty acids that play a role in promoting cardiovascular health and cancer prevention. Health Canada recommends eating at least 2 meals of fish containing omega 3 fatty acids each week.

Tips

  • To reduce the carcinogens when you grill meat on the BBQ: Marinate meat using antioxidant ingredients such as lemon, olive oil and garlic. Trim the fat so it will not drip on an open flame. Don’t overcook and flip frequently. Clean your grill after using it. Try cooking veggie-burgers, they won’t produce carcinogens compounds.
  • Establish Meat Free Monday at your home and vary your vegetarian recipes using different protein sources each week like beans and tofu.
  • Try preparing salmon with an Asian sesame/ginger sauce and many vegetables for a colorful and tasty meal.
  • In your spaghetti sauce, make it half meat and half lentils to help reduce your meat consumption and eventually make it completely vegetarian.
  • Add legumes like chickpeas and lentils to your soups and salads.
  • In you sandwiches, instead of using processed meat use cold pieces of chicken from the dinner you made the night before. Add lots of crispy vegetables.

Love whole grains

The Canadian Food Guide recommends that at least half of our cereal products should be whole grains. They are an excellent source of vitamin B, minerals and fiber. Fibre is a natural nondigestible component of all our edible plants, including grains, nuts, seeds, legumes, vegetables and fruits. It absorbs liquid and adds bulk to your stool so that your food waste passes through your intestines quickly, absorbing carcinogens and other toxins as it travels through your digestive system. It is key for digestive health!

Did you know?

  1. Studies show that a high intake of dietary fiber can help reduce your risk of developing colorectal cancer

Tips

  • At the grocery store compare the nutrition facts label on the packages of bread or breakfast cereals and choose the option that is a better source of fiber with the least sugar.
  • Start your day with a bowl of warm oatmeal with raisins.
  • Use whole grain bread or rolls for your sandwiches.
  • Try quinoa, it can easily replace rice in some of your meals or you can eat it as a salad with vegetables.
  • Add barley or brown rice to you soups.
  • Substitute whole wheat flour for all or part of the white flour when baking.
  • Choose whole grain crackers with hummus as a snack.
  • Buy whole grain spaghetti and enjoy with your favorite Italian sauce.

Get enough calcium and vitamin D

Statistics show that 2/3 of Canadians don’t eat enough dairy products even though Health Canada recommends 2 servings per day for an adult, one serving being 250 ml of milk, 175g of yogurt or 50g of cheese. Milk products are part of a healthy diet and play an important role in helping to keep your bones strong. They provide up to 16 essential nutrients, such as calcium, vitamin D, phosphorus, protein and zinc, to only name a few. Fermented dairy products such as yogurt also have the added benefit of probiotic bacteria that contributes to a healthy microbiota in your intestinal tract.

Did you know?

  1. According to the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute of Cancer Research, there is evidence indicating that milk and other dairy products suchs as yogurt, may protect against colorectal cancer. The synergistic effect of calcium, vitamin D and other milk components may be involved in this action. More specifically, it seems that the calcium in milk helps prevent the growth of benign polyps in your colon, one of the early signs of colorectal cancer.

Tips

  • Add milk to your coffee.
  • Bring a few small cheese cubes along with whole grain crackers to work for a quick nutritious snack.
  • Add some vanilla, cinnamon and fresh fruits to a glass of milk that you can blend for a delicious spicy milkshake.
  • Eat yogurt when you get hungry after work.

Choose your fats wisely

When it comes to fat, you need to keep in mind that the quality is as important as the quantity. Our body needs fatty acids that play different role in our systems, but if you eat too much fat on a regular basis it can contribute to weight gain, high blood cholesterol levels and triglycerides levels that can lead to serious health problems. Not all fats are equal and some have more to offer than others. For example, omega-3 fatty acids found in some fish (salmon, trout), seeds (flax, chia, walnuts and canola oil) are essential, meaning that they are not produced by the human body so it must come from the food that we eat.

Studies have demonstrated that the worst fats of all are trans fats. Trans fats are produced industrially and found in shortening, many snack foods, bakery products and fried fast food. They have been linked with increased risk of heart disease and they certainly have no protective effect against cancer. It is better to avoid and choose healthier options.

Also, when selecting your groceries don’t only consider the fat content of a product, take into consideration what else the food has to offer (vitamins, minerals, protein, fiber…). Sometimes, low fat and fat free products contain more sugar than regular products and therefore they are not always the best choice. Moderation remains the key!

Did you know?

  1. Virgin or extra-virgin olive oil is concentrated with antioxidants and polyphenols from the olives. Research has shown that those molecules have anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties.
  2. The health benefits of omega-3 are not limited to heart disease. According to some studies, high consumption of fish like salmon, trout and sardines can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer by 37% .
  3. Nuts contain unsaturated fats that are great options for healthy eating.

Tips

  • Read the nutrition facts table on the packages of your food to choose options that have no trans fat.
  • Try a little mashed avocado on sandwiches instead of mayonnaise that is high in saturated fats.
  • Bring nuts to work for a healthy snack. Prefer unsalted nuts and try different kinds like almonds, walnuts, pistachios and pecans.
  • When you eat potato chips, try to limit the quantities by putting some in a bowl instead of eating directly out of the bag. You will certainly eat a lot less.
  • Use some olive oil to cook your food instead of butter.
  • Eat at least 2 meals of fish during the week to increase your intake of omega 3 essential fatty acids. Salmon,trout and sardines have more omega 3 than other fish.

Drink alcohol in moderation, hydrate in a smart way

Regular consumption of alcohol in excess has been shown to increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The recommendation for a woman is to limit consumption to one drink per day and for a man not to exceed 2 drinks per day and not to drink every day. A drink is defined as 12 oz. of beer, 5 oz. of wine, and 1.5 oz. of spirits.

Smart hydration not only means to avoid drinking alcohol in excess, but also to make sure to drink enough water (at least 2L per day). Also, be careful with sweet drinks, one can of soda contains 8 teaspoons of sugar, you must imagine the amount of sugar contained in a large size drink at the movies.

Did you know?

  1. The resveratrol in red wine has a powerful anticancer action that appears to be responsible for the beneficial effects of wine preventing the development of certain cancers. Still, moderation is the key, because excess alcohol consumption increases your risk of developing colorectal cancer.
  2. According to some studies, drinking green tea on a regular basis can reduce your risk of developing colorectal cancer. It contains large amounts of catechins, molecules that have anticancer properties.

Tips

  • Drink freshly brewed green tea in the afternoon with your healthy snack.
  • Add half water to your orange juice in the morning to make it less sweet.
  • Add lemon and mint leaves to your water for a fresh boost.
  • Carry a reusable bottle of water with you, choose one that you like, so it encourages you to drink throughout the day.
  • Drink a glass of water when you drink wine.

Careful with the salt

Canadians consume an average of 3500 mg of sodium each day, which is almost 60% more than the maximum recommended intake (1500 mg). That is a lot! Most of the salt that we eat is hidden in transformed package food such as frozen meals, soups, sauce, snacks and processed meat. But you might be surprised to learn that products that taste sweet can also hide a large amount of sodium, like breakfast cereals and cookies. To make better choices, take the time to read the nutrition facts table on the packaging, compare the different products and try avoiding the options that have the much salt.

Did you know?

  1. Freshly crushed garlic adds taste to your recipes so you can add less salt. Some studies have shown that garlic contains molecules that can hinder cancer cell growth.
  2. The World Health Organization actually recommands to use more spices like turmeric, pepper, ginger, cumin and herbs like parsley, thyme, oregano and rosemary. They also contain molecules with anticancer properties.

Listen to your signals

Staying connected to our hunger and satiety signals (feeling of fullness) means to eat when you are hungry and to know when to stop! For most people, it is not as easy as it sounds. It is unfortunately common to intentionally avoid eating even when we feel hungry signals. As a result, we are starving for the next meal, often overeating and not knowing when it is the time to stop. Finishing the entire plate is not the best indicator of your needs, your feeling of fullness is a better indicator. Once you feel full, you have likely had enough! Of course, our needs can vary from a day to another depending on factors such as physical activity.

Slow down, enjoy what you eat and stay connected to your signals!


Variety is the key

No one food contains all the anticancer molecules that can prevent cancer, therefore it is important to incorporate a wide variety of healthy foods into your eating habit to increase the protective effect. The easiest way to know what you eat is to choose carefully the ingredients that you cook with!

Also, remember that all the different food groups contain specific good nutrients that are important for your health. The Canadian Food Guide helps you balance your diet by guiding you on the amount of servings you should eat from the different food groups:

Foods That Fight Cancer program

1 in 2 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetime, but research has shown that more than 50% of cancers could be prevented with a healthy lifestyle. The World Cancer Research Fund has strong evidence that being physically active, adopting healthy eating and drinking habits, not smoking and maintaining a healthy body weight can decrease the risks of developing cancer.

Foods That Fight Cancer program comes from the conviction that it is imperative to empower Canadians to eat less highly transformed foods and cook more healthy recipes to reduce their risk of developing not only colorectal cancer, but other cancers as well.

There is a need to communicate efficiently and clearly the credible scientific-based recommendations when it comes to food and cancer prevention. Most importantly, we believe that we need to influence positively towards a long-lasting behavior change.

To learn more about and to join the Foods that Fight Cancer community, visit our website and follow us on social media!



References:

American Institute for Cancer Research. Cancer Research Update. Issue 228, September 20th, 2017

Canadian Cancer Society. Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancer. 2017.

Extenso. Le Centre de référence sur la nutrition de l’Université de Montréal. Pour prévenir le cancer colorectal, 2012.

Health Canada. Nutrition and Healthy Eating, 2013.

World Cancer Research Fund. Diet, nutrition, physical activity and colorectal cancer, 2017.

Richard Béliveau, Denis Gingras. Foods That Fight Cancer, Preventing Cancer Through Diet. Revised edition, 2016. Les Éditions du Trécarré, Groupe Librex inc. 278 pages.

Bradbury, K. et coll. "Fruit, vegetable, and fiber intake in relation to cancer risk: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC.) American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. June 11, 2014.

Brooke, C. Vital Signs: Trends in Incidence of Cancers Associated with Overweight and Obesity — United States, 2005–2014. Centers for Diseaese Control and Prevention October 3, 2017.

Chan, D. et coll. ?Red and Processed Meat and Colorectal Cancer Incidence: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies?. PLoS One. 2011; 6(6): e20456.

Hall, M. et coll. A 22-year Prospective Study of Fish, n-3 Fatty Acid Intake, and Colorectal Cancer Risk in Men?. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. 2008 May; 17(5): 1136–1143.

Yang, G. Prospective Cohort Study of Green Tea Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk in Women?. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkaers & Prevention. June 2007, Volume 16, Issue 6.

Wu, Q. et coll. "Cruciferous vegetables intake and the risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of observational studies?. BAnnals of Oncology, Volume 24, Issue 4, 1 April 2013, pages 1079–1087.


Physical Activity

con-physicalActivity_full

Living an active life has many confirmed health benefits, such as prevention of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and certain cancers. On top of that, it has been shown to improve overall gastrointestinal health, help reduce constipation, make you sleep better and affect your mood positively.

The World Health Organization recommends that adults have a minimum of 150 minutes of activity every week. Try to break in down rather than doing it all at one time, it is more beneficial that way. For example, you can do 30-minute blocks of physical activity, 5 times a week. To be active doesn’t necessarily mean to join to a gym, there are many activities that can suit your preferences and lifestyle, you just need to find what brings you joy! You can also adapt your routine to make it more active by sitting less and moving more. Do you have children? Keep in mind that they need to be active at least 60 minutes a day, so get out there, move and have fun!

Did you know?

  1. Studies have shown that those who engage in regular, moderate exercise such as brisk walking, dancing or skating are at lower risk of developing colorectal cancer (25% risk reduction). The risk is reduced even more with regular vigorous activities like running, cycling and cross-country skiing.

Tips

  • Choose a distant parking spot to walk further.
  • When possible, take the stairs instead of the elevator.
  • Go out for a walk after lunch or during your break at work.
  • Play outside with your children or your pets.
  • Join to the gym with friends or organize a badminton or tennis match.
  • Don’t stay too long on your couch, move and stretch as you watch tv.
  • Take dance lessons or spinning classes.
  • Go swimming for half an hour before dinner.

References:

World Health Organization. Global recommendations on physical activity for health

Gouvernement du Québec. Portail santé mieux-être.

Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology. Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines ,2012.

Wolin, K. "Physical activity and colon cancer prevention: a meta-analysis?. British Journal of Cancer. 2009 Feb 24; 100(4): 611–616.


Weight

con-weight_full

There is strong evidence that demonstrates that being overweight or obese increases the risk of 11 cancers, including colorectal cancer. Waist circumference is also important to consider, knowing that too much excess fat in the abdominal area is also known to be a risk factor for many health problems. Eating habits and physical activity play key roles in managing a healthy body weight. The previous sections on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity provide many tips on how to make better food choices and remain active.

Be careful, very restrictive diets that are too low in calories and are not well balanced should be avoided. Those weight loss diets are often impossible to follow indefinitely, especially if you feel hungry all the time and are told to avoid certain foods at all costs. It can lead to eating disorders caused by obsessions and uncontrollable cravings for the forbidden foods and often results in long term weight gain. To seek a healthy diet to lose weight, it is recommended to ask the help of a dietitian whose expertise is to help you change your eating behaviors one step at a time for long lasting results.

Did you know?

  1. Obesity increases the risk of developing cancer by more than 40%

Quitting smoking

con-quittingSmoking_full

Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do to improve your life and health. Smoking is a notorious risk factor for cancer in organs where there is direct contact with tobacco-related carcinogens, such as lung, oropharynx, larynx and upper digestive tract, but also in organs where exposure to tobacco degradation products is indirect, such as in the colon. Smoking is significantly associated with colorectal cancer incidence. A wide range of toxic substances produced by tobacco smoke can enter the body through the saliva or blood stream and make their way down to lining of the bowel where they can damage the cellular DNA and lead to cancer formation.

This resource from Health Canada can help you quit smoking: On the road to quitting: guide to becoming a non-smoker.

A Second Chance And New Priorities


Living in Remission

Remission is when the signs and symptoms of cancer have decreased or disappeared, although cancer may still be in the body. Living in remission can be a source of both relief and anxiety — relief that the tumour is gone and anxiety that it may recur. It is important for you to deal with changes in your attitude to your life, your relationships and yourself. While hoping that the disease stays in remission, it is also important to remember that it can recur. Take the time to maintain your health and follow your physician’s recommendations for follow-up visits.


If Cancer Returns

If you experience a relapse, you may feel even worse psychologically than when you were first diagnosed because you had hoped and believed that the cancer was cured. However, it may actually be easier for you to cope the second time around; you already know what to expect, how to find support and how to manage your disease. Remember, if your cancer was successfully treated once, it may be successfully treated again. Use whatever support you need to get through a relapse.


Facing Sterility

If you are intending to have children, it would be beneficial to discuss options with your healthcare professionals prior to starting treatment. If you want to have children and you are not able to as a result of your cancer treatment, you may face several practical and emotional issues. You may be able to deal with your disappointment on your own, or you may need help. Your partner, friends, family or support groups can help.


Five Ways to Stay Healthy

For most people, age and diet contribute to developing colorectal cancer, not the genes they were born with. Your age and family history of the disease are beyond your control, but you can control some risk factors considered to be related to lifestyle. Studies indicate that certain lifestyle decisions increase risk factors for colorectal cancer, such as smoking, diet and your alcohol intake.

  1. Alcohol consumption: Alcohol may increase your risk. Lower rates of colorectal cancer have been found in those who drink no alcohol. Although small amounts of alcohol are thought to lower the risk of some types of heart disease, it appears that alcohol, particularly in larger quantities, may contribute to the incidence of colorectal cancer.
  2. Weight: Being overweight (particularly having excess fat in the waist area rather than the hips or thighs) increases your risk, particularly for men.
  3. Physical activity: Lack of physical activity has been associated with higher rates of colorectal cancer, and can obviously lead to weight gain as well. People who are physically active before a diagnosis of colorectal cancer appear to do better. People who take up regular physical activity after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer often have improved outcomes.
  1. Smoking: Long-term, heavy smoking may also increase your risk. Studies indicate that smokers are two to three times more likely to develop colorectal polyps.
  2. Diet: Your eating habits may have an effect on your risk of developing colorectal cancer. A lot of research has been conducted, but there are still many unanswered questions. Certain foods seem to be related to the risk of colorectal cancer, but not all studies are in agreement.
  3. Fats: Some studies have shown that foods high in fat (fried foods, red meat and “junk food” such as potato chips and other packaged snacks) may put you at risk. Foods low in fat will help you maintain a healthy weight. This will lower your risk for colorectal cancer.
  4. Fibre: Some studies suggest that a higher intake of fibre may have a protective effect on the functioning of the colon. Many studies have looked at the benefits of fibre for reducing colorectal cancer risk. Fibre can be obtained by eating lots of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and legumes (beans, lentils, and nuts).
  5. Fruits and vegetables: At least one vegetable or fruit per meal and snack may help protect you against this cancer and many other diseases. Your risk may be increased if you don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables.
  6. Meat consumption: Several studies have shown that eating large quantities of red meat or processed meat plays a part in developing colorectal cancer. Cooking meats at high temperatures (frying or barbecuing) may turn harmless substances in the meat into cancer-causing agents or carcinogens

Emotional Support

People who have had similar experiences can often offer support. Ask your oncologist, your cancer nurse or the oncology social worker for information about groups in your area. In addition, Colorectal Cancer Canada (CCC) manage support groups in several communities across Canada to assist patients and their caregivers throughout their cancer journey.

Treatment Options

Different treatment options are available to patients depending on the size, location and stage of colorectal cancer.

Local therapies consist of surgery, radiation therapy and interventional radiology. These therapies can remove or destroy cancer in a particular area such as the colon, rectum, liver, lungs, peritoneum etc. without affecting other parts of the body.

Systemic therapies consist of chemotherapy and biological therapy whereby drugs enter the bloodstream and destroy or control cancer throughout the body.

Understanding your options in managing the disease is important which is why Colorectal Cancer Canada has developed a comprehensive guide to understanding colorectal cancer treatments. The treatments have been organized according to the following sections:

  • Surgical Therapies
  • Drug Therapies
  • Radiation Therapies
  • Interventional Radiology
  • Immunotherapy

The sections provide in depth information on therapies for all stages of colorectal cancer according to

  • Anatomical site
  • Treatment modality
  • Stage of disease

From Chemotherapeutic Agents to Biosimilars

Learn the difference between chemotherapeutic agents, small molecules, biologics, and biosimilars, all of which play a role in the management of colorectal cancer. They all kill colorectal cancer cells but how do they differ and at what point are they administered in a patient’s treatment plan?

Did You Know…

  1. Chemotherapeutic drugs affect "younger" tumors more effectively because mechanisms regulating cell growth are usually still preserved.
  2. Newer anticancer drugs act directly against abnormal proteins in cancer cells; this is termed targeted therapy and the drugs which commonly target cancer cells are called biologics.

Side Effects

The treatment of colorectal cancer may consist of one or a combination of the following: chemotherapy, biological or targeted therapy, radiation therapy, or surgery. These therapies are designed to kill or eradicate cancer cells throughout the body. Not surprisingly, these therapies may also damage normal, healthy cells that are not affected by the cancer which results in an adverse side effect of the treatment.

When cancer therapies cannot distinguish between cancer cells and normal, healthy cells, the result is an unwanted side effect.

Many side effects of treatment are normal and pose no danger to you other than a minor inconvenience, such as changes in fingernail growth. What is important to remember is that most side effects are merely temporary and will subside once the body adjusts to therapy or when therapy is completed.

Do not become discouraged about the side effects induced from colorectal cancer therapies, for remedies are readily available and symptoms short-lived.


Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are research studies designed to evaluate new cancer treatment options. They test the safety and effectiveness of treatments. Clinical trials evaluate:

  • A new anti-cancer drug
  • Unique approaches to surgery and radiation therapy
  • And new combinations of treatments

A drug being studied in a clinical trial is called an investigational drug. There are 4 phases to clinical trials and they answer the following questions:

  • Phase I: Is the treatment safe?
  • Phase II: Does the therapy work?
  • Phase III: Is the therapy better than what is currently available?
  • Phase IV: What else do we need to know?

It is important to note that all new cancer drugs that are currently available for the treatment of colorectal cancer, were only once available through clinical trials.

While the decision to enroll in a clinical trial of a novel cancer treatment is ultimately very personal, a clear understanding of the nature of clinical trials can help patients make the choice that is appropriate for them.

Did You Know…

  1. A clinical trial is performed only when there is good reason to believe that the treatment being studied may be better than the one currently used?
  2. All new cancer drugs currently available for the treatment of colorectal cancer were once only available through clinical trials?


To find a cancer trial in Canada visit canadiancancertrials.ca


Treatment Updates

Research has shown that patient education lowers uncertainty and the stress that comes with not knowing what to expect as a patient begins cancer treatment. Uncertainty is a known stressor that interferes with health, therefore, reducing it will improve the odds of successful cancer therapy. Preparation may also equip cancer patients and their caregivers with knowledge about good coping strategies, including how to cope with the fatigue that comes with treatment through adjusting work load and family life.

This is why Colorectal Cancer provides information on treatment updates in our comprehensive Library. These documents contain colorectal cancer treatment and clinical research updates across the continuum of care.

Most colorectal cancer treatment modalities are represented and up to date information is provided in a user-friendly language. The documents furnish information relating to:

  • Drugs & Systemic Therapies
  • Surgical Therapies
  • Radiation Therapies
  • Interventional Therapies
  • Screening
  • Psychosocial Oncology
  • Other
  • Nutrition & Healthy Lifestyle

To access up to date information on colorectal cancer, visit our library and select the Treatment Updates category.


Naturopathic Medicine and Colorectal Cancer

Prevention, especially in those who are at a higher risk for colorectal cancer, is the first and foremost important step in the fight against cancer. While there are many risk factors for colorectal cancer that cannot be modified such as age, family history of colorectal cancer, race, ethnicity and inherited syndromes, there are many things that can be done to help prevent the occurrence of cancer. Some of these include a healthy diet, regular physical activity, smoking cessation and limiting alcohol consumption.

Naturopathic medicine is an important part of Colorectal Cancer Care and offers therapies that:

  1. Reduce the risk of initially developing colorectal cancer
  2. Are supportive during chemotherapy, radiation and/or surgery and help to improve both the tolerance and success of conventional therapies
  3. Help prevent recurrence once cancer has been successfully treated.

Ostomy

Surgical removal of a malignant tumor is the most common treatment for colorectal cancer. The diseased portion of the colon and/or rectum is removed, and in most cases, the healthy portions are reattached (often referred to as anastomosis). Sometimes, that is not possible because of the extent of the disease or its location. In this case, a surgical opening is made through the abdomen to provide a new pathway for waste elimination. This is what is commonly referred to as an ostomy. The ostomy can be permanent, when an organ must be removed, or it can be temporary, when the organ needs time to heal.

For colorectal cancer, there are two types of ostomy:

  • Ileostomy (1) - the bottom of the small intestine (ileum) is attached to the stoma (opening). This bypasses the colon, rectum and anus.
  • Colostomy (2) - the left side of the colon is attached to the stoma. This bypasses the rectum and the anus.

A stoma (means opening) is a portion of your small or large intestine that has been brought through the surface of the abdomen (belly) which provides an alternative path for fecal waste to leave the body. A surgeon forms a stoma by bringing out a piece of bowel onto the abdomen and turns it back like a turtleneck and then sutures it to the abdominal wall. An ostomy flange and pouch with an adhesive backing is then attached over the stoma and worn on the abdomen to collect waste. It will require emptying throughout the day and completely changed at least once a week.

Did You Know…

  1. An ostomy need not be permanent. It may be reversed 9 months after your colorectal surgery. Speak with your colorectal surgical oncologist.
  2. People living with a permanent ostomy can lead a perfectly fulfilling and enriching life!

Since a percentage of the colorectal cancer population may require an ostomy, it is with this in mind that Colorectal Cancer Canada has developed a guide to helping patients understand the different types of ostomies and the care required to properly manage them.

This guide will help you better understand ostomies – what they are, why they are required, how they affect the normal digestive process, and what changes they can bring to a person’s life.

Definition

Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in the colon or the rectum. Colon and rectal cancers arise from the same type of cell and have many similarities. It is for this reason they are often referred to collectively as “colorectal cancer”. The cells lining the colon or rectum can sometimes become abnormal and divide rapidly. These cells can form benign (non-cancerous) tumours or growths called polyps. Although not all polyps will develop into colorectal cancer, colorectal cancer almost always develops from a polyp. Over a period of many years, a polyp’s cells may undergo a series of DNA changes that cause them to become malignant (cancerous). At first, these cancer cells are contained on the surface of a polyp, but can grow into the wall of the colon or rectum where they can gain access to blood and lymph vessels. Once this happens, the cancer can spread to lymph nodes and other organs, such as the liver or lungs—this process is called metastasis, and tumours found in distant organs are called metastases.

Polyps larger than one centimeter, with extensive villous patterns, have an increased risk of developing into cancer. The vast majority of colorectal cancers are adenocarcinomas, tumours that arise from the mucosa cells of the colon.

Did You Know…

  1. Symptoms of colorectal cancer can be mistaken for other ailments. Please click on the Section entitled “Symptoms” to learn how you can distinguish between colorectal cancer and other harmless conditions.
  2. Patients with Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. To learn more, visit our “Risk Factors” Section.

Risk Factors

Experts are not completely sure why colorectal cancer develops in some people and not others. However, several risk factors have been identified over the years. Risk factors for colorectal cancer can be divided into two main groups: those that you cannot change and those that are lifestyle-related and, therefore, subject to change.

Risk Factors You Cannot Change:

  • Age: The risk of developing colorectal cancer increases with age. The disease is more common in people over the age of 50, and the chance of developing colorectal cancer increases with each decade. However, colorectal cancer has also been known to develop in younger people as well. (Patel, 2009: Gairdiello, 2008)
  • Type II Diabetes
  • Personal History of Colorectal Polyps/Cancer
  • Personal History of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
  • Family History of Colorectal Cancer or Adenomatous Polyps
  • Inherited Syndromes: Genetic syndromes passed through generations of one’s family can increase one’s risk of developing colorectal cancer.
  • Racial & Ethnic Background: African Americans and Jews of Eastern European descent (Ashkenazi Jews) are two groups most affected by colorectal cancer.
  • Personal History of Other Cancers

Lifestyle-Related Risk Factors That Can Be Altered:

  • Diet
  • Sedentary Lifestyle/Physical Inactivity
  • Obesity
  • Alcohol Consumption

Did You Know….

  1. Being physically inactive is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. A simple walk around the block can help boost your activity level.
  2. Colorectal Cancer Canada is part of a global effort, the Never Too Young Program, dedicated to the increasing number of patients under the age of 50 being diagnosed with colorectal cancer.
  3. Low intake of fruits, vegetables and fibre can increase your risk of developing colorectal cancer. Add colorful vegetables and fruits to your diet.

Symptoms

Many people with colorectal cancer experience no symptoms in the early stages of the disease. When symptoms appear they will likely vary depending on the cancer’s size and location in the large intestine, also known as the colorectum. Studies suggest that the average duration of symptoms (from onset to diagnosis) is 14 weeks. There is no association between overall duration of symptoms and the stage of the tumor. Therefore, it is best to get regular screenings rather than rely on colorectal cancer symptoms to alert one to the presence of a tumor. This is because colorectal cancer can grow for years before causing any symptoms. But, knowing what to look out for most certainly cannot hurt. Typical symptoms resulting from colorectal cancer are:

  • Constipation/Diarrhea
  • Narrow Stools
  • Abdominal Cramps
  • Bloody Stools
  • Unexplained Weight Loss/Loss of Appetite
  • Sense of Fullness
  • Nausea & Vomiting
  • Gas & Bloating
  • Fatigue/Lethargy

Did You Know…

  1. Colon cancer can be present for several years before symptoms develop. Screening is critical.
  2. The left side of the colon is narrower than the right colon. Therefore, cancers of the left colon are more likely to cause partial or complete bowel obstruction. This can cause symptoms of constipation, narrowed stool, diarrhea, abdominal pains, cramps, and bloating.

ask your questions

Diagnosis

Diagnosing colorectal cancer starts with a visit to your family doctor who will review your symptoms, conduct a physical exam and possibly order blood tests. If results suggest that colorectal cancer might be present, your doctor may recommend one or more additional tests for an official diagnosis. A Flexible Sigmoidoscopy or a Colonoscopy are common diagnostic tests that allow your doctor to remove tissue and perform a biopsy to confirm the presence of cancer. If colorectal cancer is detected, you may need further tests to find out the position and size of the cancer, as well as determine the extent of your cancer. These tests may include blood tests and image tests such as an Ultrasound or CT scan.


Staging

Staging of colorectal cancer refers to how far a cancer has spread on a scale from 0 to IV, with 0 meaning a cancer that has not begun to invade the colon wall and IV describing cancer that has spread beyond the original site to other parts of the body. Staging describes the extent of the cancer based on:

  1. how many layers of the bowel wall are affected,
  2. whether lymph nodes are involved, and
  3. if there it has spread to other organs.

For colorectal cancer, staging often can’t be completed until after surgery to remove the primary tumour along with surrounding tissue (containing lymph nodes), and possibly lesions found on other organs.

Below is generally how the cancer is referred to between doctor and patient:

  1. The cancer is confined to the innermost layer of the colon or rectum. It has not yet invaded the bowel wall. Is also referred to as high grade dysplasia
  2. The cancer has penetrated some or several layers of the colon or rectum wall.
  3. The cancer has penetrated the entire wall of the colon or rectum and may extend into nearby tissue(s).
  4. The cancer has spread to the lymph nodes.
  5. The cancer has spread to distant organs, usually the liver or lungs.

Did You Know…

  1. Staging of your colorectal cancer is an important indication of the type of treatment you may receive.
  2. The size of your colorectal tumour doesn’t influence the outcome.

Colorectal cancer information and support groups now exist in several communities across Canada to assist patients and their caregivers throughout their cancer journey. Monthly meetings are held where patients, caregivers and their families share experiences, offer help and provide colorectal cancer information. Monthly meetings follow a unique model:

  1. Presentation of clinical research updates on the most current treatment options:
    These updates allow patients to make more informed decisions surrounding their treatment plans and provides them the opportunity to have thoughtful dialogues with their treating oncologists.
  2. Review of each patient’s case to ensure optimal support:
    Group members are encouraged to share information about their journey, addressing concerns with respect to treatments or side effects, fears, nutrition, post treatment follow up care, or any issue they feel worthy for discussion.

Did You Know…

  1. Across Canada, more than two million people are now involved in information/support groups.
  2. People who have social support are healthier than those who do not.

Here are some of the benefits reported by patients who have attended our Information/Support Groups:

  • Learning more about the cancer
  • Learning more about the resources for people with cancer
  • Feeling that life is more meaningful
  • Being able to cope with illness and with medical procedures
  • Having a better perspective on illness
  • Being more aware of needs
  • Being able to talk about cancer
  • Being able to talk with family and friends about cancer
  • Feeling stronger
  • Feeling more empowered or able to make decisions
  • Being less isolated
  • Being more active, socially and physically

There is a growing need to increase the number of Information/Support Groups across Canada. There are currently 14 groups operating across Canada. There are, however, 21 requests from Cancer Centres/Support Centres to introduce CCC Information/Support Groups. CCC is tasked with the training of additional Cancer Coaches as well as the creation of these new Information/Support Groups. Financial support is highly welcomed to help meet the growing demands in the provision of supportive care and access to vital information for colorectal cancer patients and their families.


“There aren’t enough words to say what the CCC Information/Support Group has done for our daughter and family. We attend the monthly group meeting faithfully wherein we are furnished with so much information by a Cancer Coach on treatments and the disease. Just speaking to other group members who are battling the same disease, treatment and side effects has made our journey so much easier. With this extraordinary Association and the courageous people who attend the monthly support meetings, we truly feel that together we can handle anything that comes our way. We encourage all colorectal cancer patients to contact the CCC Cancer Coach Program.”

Gurreri Family


Appearing below is a list of colorectal cancer information/support groups currently operating in Canada. Should you wish to inquire about them or do not see one operating in your community, do not hesitate to contact us to see if one has just started running in your city or if we can be of service to you through a Cancer Coach.

Together we can make a difference!


COLORECTAL CANCER INFORMATION/SUPPORT GROUPS

Orchard Barn Wellness Centre Support Group
3020 Erickson Road, Creston, B.C.
Susan Snow
snowz@shaw.ca


BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre
John Jambor Room, Main Floor, 600 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
John Christopherson
jchristo@bccancer.bc.ca
604 877 6000 x2190


Wellspring Calgary
1404 Home Road, Calgary, Alberta
Trudy@wellspringcalgary.ca


Cancer Care Manitoba
675 McDermot Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Michele Rice
204 787 4286


The Pallisades
100 Isabella Street, Ottawa, Ontario
Kim Anne DeChamplain Kim_anne.de_champlain@cspo.qc.ca


Colorectal Cancer Resource & Action Network (CCRAN) Wellspring Oakville
2545 Sixth Line (Trafalgar/Dundas), Oakville, Ontario
Peter Hildyard
Peter.hildyard@gmail.com


Hearth Place Cancer Support Centre
86 Colborne Street West, Oshawa, Ontario
Ted Trueman & Rosemary Donnelly
Contact Meredith Shaw, at Hearth Place: 905 579 4833 or
meredith@hearthplace.org

North York General Hospital
Temporarily Suspended
Toronto, Ontario


Toronto General Hospital (ELLICSR)
Temporarily Suspended
Toronto, Ontario


Wellspring Downtown
Temporarily Suspended
Toronto, Ontario


Wellspring Westerkirk
Temporarily Suspended
Toronto, Ontario


Wellspring Chinguacousy
Temporarily Suspended
Brampton, Ontario


Hope & Cope Wellness Centre
4635 Cote St. Catherine West (corner of Lavoie Street), Montreal, Quebec
Frank Pitman, CCC Staff
frankp@colorectalcancercanada.com
Please rsvp with Hope and Cope at
514 340 3616
Bilingual dialogue


West Island Cancer Wellness Centre
489 Beaconsfield Blvd, Baie-D’Urfe, Quebec
Frank Pitman, CCC Staff
frankp@colorectalcancercanada.com
Bilingual dialogue

Cancer Coaches are dedicated volunteers located across Canada who have received special training and certification in the medical and surgical treatment of colorectal cancer, psychosocial coping, navigation of the healthcare system and so much more. Patients may be referred to their local Cancer Coach (through email or phone) when they contact us requesting information or support. All Cancer Coaches are under the direction of our qualified staff and Medical Advisory Board.

Cancer Coaches provide support and information in a myriad of ways including over the phone, online and through face to face meetings if specifically requested to do so. Every effort is made by Cancer Coaches to ensure that a first response to a query is provided within 24 hours. All Cancer Coaches are supervised by our full-time Director of Education to assist them in their responses. CCC’s Medical Advisory Board can be called upon as necessary to ensure the delivery of the highest quality of information.

Did You Know…..

  1. Patients who have social support are healthier than those who do not?
  2. Cancer Coaches can furnish patients and caregivers with information on treatment-related side effects, hereditary syndromes, testing and registries as well as access to new and evolving therapies?

The responsibilities of a Cancer Coach are as follows:

  • To address queries by phone, email or in person
  • Complete a Cancer Coach Program Record (‘CCPR’) for each query for centralized record keeping
  • Have an openness to join in a community of like-minded Cancer Coaches
  • Have a willingness to train and develop skills in active listening and increase their knowledge of colorectal cancer management
  • Have a capacity to network with others in fact-finding on behalf of patients in need

Cancer Coaches provide patients and caregivers with information relating to the following topics:

  • Psychosocial support
  • Navigation of the healthcare system
  • Treatment and management of colorectal cancer
  • Access to new and evolving therapies
  • Treatment-related side effects
  • Screening
  • Information on hereditary syndromes, testing and registries

CCC surveyed patients and caregivers who have accessed Cancer Coaches over the years. We asked what benefits if any did they feel they experienced from accessing a Cancer Coach:

  • Learning more about their cancer
  • Feeling life is more meaningful
  • Better perspective on illness
  • Access to highly skilled experts through second opinions and referrals
  • More aware of needs
  • Able to talk with family and friends about my cancer
  • Able to cope with disease and medical procedures
  • Improved outcomes from accessing novel treatments
  • Feeling empowered and in control

As a result of accessing the Cancer Coach Program, a number of patients have been able to obtain novel therapies both within and outside of Canada to treat their disease.


“The Cancer Coach Program saved my life. Because of the information I was provided, I was able to access Avastin in Buffalo and then went on to have the much-needed lung surgery to cure me of stage IV colon cancer. 8 years later I am still disease free because of CCC! Thank you!!”

Linda Wilkins, Stage IV Survivor


Facilitating referrals for second opinions has also led to improved patient outcomes resulting from a change in treatment plans.


“My Cancer Coach’s support, knowledge and connections in the colorectal cancer community helped me make informed decisions and got me fast-tracked into a world-class facility and best possible treatment for me. Her compassion, unremitting encouragement, help in navigating the medical system and unfailing willingness to do whatever it takes has helped me access a therapy I would not have otherwise accessed had I stayed in the community hospital I started in. I honestly don't know where I would be without her and CCC.”

Bob Mountford, Stage IV Patient


CCC continues to receive positive feedback from the patients and caregivers it has served through the Cancer Coach Program. Some of the widely-observed benefits of the Program as reported by Cancer Coaches, patients, caregivers and Medical Advisory Board Members are:

  • It is effective in lowering anxiety, reducing distress, improving a sense of personal control, and fostering acceptance and peace
  • It is adaptable for use at home and in small groups, for one-on-one teaching, or as a seminar
  • Patients and families who live in rural areas or who cannot physically access the program can participate via our website, email and telephone
  • The program is sustainable due to its practicality, and is suitable for families and patients during any stage of the cancer journey

CCC continues to promote the Cancer Coach Support Program directly to patients. In addition, our patient information materials are distributed in most Cancer Centers across the country. Many Cancer Centers promote the program to their patient population directly through their patient education libraries, or through their oncologists or by providing patients and caregivers with a CCC Support Program Pamphlet. These materials are so popular and in such heavy demand that CCC is challenged to keep up with the requests.


“Advances in treatment of colorectal cancers bring so much hope to our patients but also introduce a dizzying new array of decisions, stresses and anxieties. The amazing help the colorectal Cancer Coaches provide in support and navigation are so crucial to our patient care journeys that I think of our coaches as part of the treatment plan along with surgery, radiation or chemotherapy!"

Dr. Calvin Law,
Hepatobiliary Surgical Oncologist
Chief, Odette Cancer Centre
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
CCC Medical Advisory Board Member


Be well informed and supported and learn about colorectal cancer care and treatment through our caring and thoughtful Cancer Coaches. Remember, asking questions and seeking answers is a sure sign of coping well! Together, we can make a difference.

About

The Wendy Bear Patient Assistance Program is named in memory of the wife of hockey legend Darryl Sittler, a long-time supporter of our charity. Wendy was instrumental in assisting with raising awareness and funds for Colon Cancer Canada before her passing in 2002. She wanted to ensure that anyone diagnosed with colorectal cancer would have the necessary supports to help them manage their life with this disease. It is in her memory that the Wendy Bear was created with 100% of the proceeds from the sale of the bear going directly to support palliative care patients in need.


Eligibility

All colorectal cancer patients residing in Canada who are experiencing financial hardship due to the disease are eligible to access this program. Financial assistance is awarded on a calendar year basis to patients that are deemed to be in financial need and meet our income qualification guidelines.

Patients must supply:

  1. A copy of their previous year tax return
  2. Spouse/partner’s previous year tax return
  3. A letter stating:
    • all other support funding amounts received by patient, or expected to be received by patient during that calendar year - the financial situation of the patient
    • All receipts corresponding with the request

Patients may reapply for support as often as it is needed but Colorectal Cancer Canada reserves the right to decline additional funding to a patient if the additional funding will bring the total support over the calendar year maximum of $1,500 per patient.

Each application for assistance is reviewed by the board taking into consideration income level, the number of household dependents and current out-of-pocket medical and day to day expenses.

Living with cancer is a challenge. Only you can decidehow to best cope with your cancer and treatments, andhow to manage your daily life. You will feel better if youparticipate actively in managing your disease.

In addition to the medical aspects of cancer, you will have to cope with many differentemotional, psychological and practical issues. You may need to make decisions aboutpriorities that you would not otherwise have had to make.

This section includes coping techniques that many patients have found useful, as wellas resources to find the help and information you need.


Putting Statistics in Perspective

Many published statistics are outdated because they are based on older methods oftreating cancer. In addition, statistics indicate only how groups of patients respondto a particular disease or treatment; they cannot predict an individual’s response.You want to know what your chances are, but it is best not to let a positive attitudebe negatively affected by statistics which really have nothing to do with you.

To better cope with your cancer, focus your mental and emotional resources in a positive way.


Coping with Treatment

It may seem difficult, but it’s best to acknowledge, experience and talk about howyou feel. You may prefer to talk to family, friends, a member of your healthcare team or other patients in a support group. A support or self-help group can be a goodplace to talk with others who have dealt with similar problems, to learn how they arecoping and to share your feelings and experiences.

You may also wish to talk with aprofessional counsellor, such as a psychologist, to help you deal with your emotions.Most people find that they cope with their illness better if they have good emotionalsupport. Seek the emotional support to suit your needs.

Techniques to lower anxiety, such as meditation or relaxation, may help you cope withyour cancer journey. Several programs are available to help teach you how to bettercope with stress such as our Cancer Coach Support Program.


Relationships

Cancer doesn’t only touch your life, but also the lives of those around you. Sharingyour cancer experience with others may make some relationships grow stronger andcause some others to become strained or even dissolve.

Most people are supportive and caring when they learn that someone close to them has cancer, although others may have difficulty dealing with their own emotions. Theymay respond by withdrawing, by blaming you for having cancer, by making insensitiveremarks such as “be grateful it can be treated,” or by giving you unwanted advice.

Their reactions may hurt you or leave you angry at a time when you need support.People who respond this way do so because of their own fears, not because theydon’t care. Choose who you wish to tell about your diagnosis. Having someone elseyou can talk to can be helpful and even energizing.


Age

Cancer can affect people at any stage in their lives. Each stage has its special concerns, and you might find it useful to talk to people your own age.

Young people are often concerned about the effect of cancer on completing theireducation, establishing a career, dating, social relationships and starting a family. Middle-aged individuals often find that cancer interrupts their career and makes it more difficult to look after others who depend on them, such as children or agingparents.

Older patients may worry about the effect of cancer on other health problems, about not having enough support or about losing the opportunity to enjoytheir retirement.

It is important to deal with your concerns and come to terms with them. You canfind a support group specifically for patients with colorectal cancer and share similar experiences.


Self-image

Although hair loss does not occur as a result of all treatments for colorectal cancer, you may experience short-term changes such as loss of hair, dry skin, brittle nails, a blotchycomplexion, and hand and foot syndrome. The Look Good...Feel Better program teaches women with cancer how to deal with their physical appearance.


Fatigue

Tiredness is a common side effect that may limit what you can accomplish on anygiven day. Consider whether you can continue working or going to school full-time.Set priorities. Pace yourself and listen to your body. Stop and rest when you aretired.


Complementary/Alternative Therapies (CATs)

Meditation, relaxation and visualization often help patients with cancer to lowerstress and anxiety levels, and maintain a positive attitude. There are many differenttypes of therapy that promote relaxation. Your healthcare team or support group canhelp you find workshops that teach these techniques. Exercise is also important toreduce stress and frustration. Experiment with different techniques or activities to find what’s best for you and what helps improve your feelings of well-being.

You may also be interested in experimenting with “natural” medicines, vitamins,herbal remedies or other unproven therapies advertised as cures for cancer. Usingthem may make your cancer therapy work less effectively — unproven treatments have not been scientifically tested and may contain unknown products or additives that may conflict with treatment prescribed by your healthcare team.

To make certainof the most effective treatment, discuss with the members of your healthcare teamyour interest in CATs prior to taking them, especially during treatment.

Meet our Medical Advisory Board

CCC is kept abreast of the latest medical advances in the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer by an expert medical advisory board.

  • Dr. Pierre Major, Medical Oncologist, Chair - Hamilton Regional Cancer Center, Hamilton, ON
  • Dr. David Armstrong, Gastroenterology - McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton ON
  • Dr. Shady Ashamalla, Surgical Oncology - Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Gaurav Bahl, Radiation Oncology - Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, ON
  • Dr. Oliver Bathe, Surgical Oncology - University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
  • Dr. Gerald Batist, Medical Oncology - Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC
  • Dr. Sylvie Bourque, Medical Oncology - Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Surrey, BC
  • Dr. Robin Boushey, Surgical Oncology - The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON
  • Dr. Christine Brezden-Masley, Medical Oncology - St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Ron Bridges, Research - University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
  • Dr. Margot Burnell, Medical Oncology - Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, NB
  • Dr. Eric Chen, Medical Oncology - Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Zane Cohen, Professor of Surgery, Director - Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Bruce Colwell, Medical Oncology - Queen Elizabeth II Health Science Centre, Halifax, NS
  • Dr. Christine Cripps, Medical Oncology - The Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, Ottawa, ON
  • Dr. Robert Dinniwell, Radiation Oncology - Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Sam Elfassy, Gastroenterology - St. Joseph’s Health Centre, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Mary Jane Esplen, Psychosocial - Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Margaret Fitch, Psychosocial - Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. William Foulkes, Genetics - Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC
  • Dr. Steven Gallinger, Surgical Oncology - Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario
  • Dr. Carman Giacomantonio, Surgical Oncology - Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS
  • Dr. Sharlene Gill, Medical Oncology - BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC
  • Dr. Philip H. Gordon, Surgical Oncology - Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC
  • Dr. Duane Hartley, General Practice - Charleswood Medical Clinic, Winnipeg, MB
  • Dr. Robert (Bob) Hilsden, Research - Southern Albert Cancer Research Institute, Calgary AB
  • Dr. Paul Karanicolas, Surgical Oncology (Hepatobiliary) - Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Yoo Joung Ko, Medical Oncology - Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Monika Krzyzanowska, Medical Oncology - Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Calvin Law, Surgical Oncology - Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Becky Lee, Naturopathic Medicine - Marsden Centre, Vaughan, ON
  • Dr. Sender Liberman, Surgical Oncology - Montreal General Hospital, Montreal QC
  • Dr. Eric Marsden, Naturopathic Medicine - Marsden Centre, Vaughan, ON
  • Ms. Celestina Martopullo, Psychosocial - Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB
  • Dr. Andrea McCart, Surgical Oncology - Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Barb Melosky, Medical Oncology - BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC
  • Dr. David Mulder, Cardiothoracic Surgery - Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, QC
  • Ms. Fiona O’Shea, Palliative Care - Dr. H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, St. John’s NL
  • Dr. Terry Phang, Surgical Oncology - St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC
  • Dr. Geoff Porter, Surgical Oncology - Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS
  • Dr. Daniel Rayson, Medical Oncologist - Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS
  • Dr. Carole Richard, Surgical Oncology - Hôpital Saint-Luc du CHUM, Montréal, QC
  • Dr. Daryl Roitman, Medical Oncology - North York General Hospital, Toronto, ON, M2K 1E1
  • Dr. Andrew Scarfe, Medical Oncology - Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton AB
  • Dr. Lucas Sideris, Surgical Oncology - Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC
  • Dr. Andrew Smith, Surgical Oncology - Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Jennifer Spratlin, Medical Oncology - Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB
  • Dr. John Srigley, Pathology - Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga, ON
  • Dr. Deborah Terespolsky, Genetics - Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga, ON
  • Jean-Luc C. Urbain - Lebanon VA Medical Center, Lebanon, PA
  • Dr. Ramses Wassef, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine - CHUM, Hôpital Saint-Luc, Montreal, QC
  • Dr. Clarence Wong, Gastroenterology - Royal Alexandra Hospital, Edmonton, AB
  • Dr. Rebecca K.S. Wong - Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON
  • Dr. Huiming Yang, Gastroenterology - Alberta Health Services, Calgary AB
  • Dr. Rami Younan, Surgical Oncology - CHUM, Hotel Dieu, Montreal, QC

Meet the Team

BARRY D. STEIN
President
1350 rue Sherbrooke West
Suite 300
Montréal, QC H3G 1J1
barrys@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (514) 875-7745 ext. 2530
F: (514) 875-7746


BUNNIE SCHWARTZ
Co-Founder
4576 Yonge Street, Suite 605
North York, ON M2N 6N4
bunnies@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (416) 785-0449 ext. 2623
F: (416) 785-0450


CATHIE JACKSON
Director of Operations
1350 rue Sherbrooke West
Suite 300
Montréal, QC H3G 1J1
cathiej@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (514) 875-7745 ext.2524
F: (514) 875-7746


FRANK PITMAN
Patient and Volunteer Support
1350 rue Sherbrooke West
Suite 300
Montréal, QC H3G 1J1
frankp@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (514) 875-7745 ext. 2529
F: (514) 875-7746

FILOMENA SERVIDIO-ITALIANO
Director of Education and Clinical Information
4576 Yonge Street, Suite 605
North York, ON M2N 6N4
filomenas@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (416) 785-0449 ext. 2632
F: (416) 785-0450


ANNE-MARIE MYERS
Coordinator of Clinical Information and Program Development
1350 rue Sherbrooke West
Suite 300
Montréal, QC H3G 1J1
annemariem@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (514) 875-7745 ext. 2537
F: (514) 875-7746


ZOE MANDELOS
Administrative Assistant
1350 rue Sherbrooke West
Suite 300
Montréal, QC H3G 1J1
zoem@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (514) 875-7745 ext. 2527
F: (514) 875-7746


Meet our Board Members

Colorectal Cancer Canada is led by a volunteer Board of Directors. Our board includes colorectal cancer patients and business professionals. All members of our Board of Directors reside in Canada.

  • Barry D. Stein - President & CEO, Montreal, QC
  • Craig Langpap - Chairman & Treasurer, Victoria, BC
  • Garry Sears - Secretary, Ottawa, ON
  • Sarita Benchimol - Member, Montreal, QC
  • Amy Elmaleh - Member, Toronto, ON
  • Hyla Goldstein - Member, Toronto, ON
  • Martin Gosselin - Member, Montreal, QC
  • Paul Greenberg - Member, Toronto, ON
  • Michael Kalmar - Member, Toronto, ON
  • Melvin Mogil - Member, Toronto, ON
  • Alan Peters - Member, Toronto, ON
  • Todd Shute - Member, Toronto, ON

Who We Are

On July 1, 2017, Colon Cancer Canada and the Colorectal Association of Canada joined forces to become Colorectal Cancer Canada (CCC) and is now Canada’s sole patient association dedicated to improving the quality of life of patients, increasing awareness and educating the public about prevention and treatment of Canada’s second biggest cancer killer for men and women combined.


Our Mission

Colorectal Cancer Canada is the country’s leading colorectal cancer not for profit patient organization, dedicated to colorectal cancer awareness and education, supporting patients and their families and advocating on their behalf.


Our Vision

We envision a world where early screening and detection results in 100% survival for colorectal cancer.

We have some exciting news!

The Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada and Colon Cancer Canada have amalgamated and will be known as Colorectal Cancer Canada effective July 1, 2017.

Colorectal Cancer Canada will continue under the dedicated leadership of Barry D. Stein as President and CEO working closely with Co-Founder Bunnie Schwartz, who will continue her work in patient support and development. One great team working for patients across Canada!

Amy Elmaleh will be stepping down from a successful career as Executive Director allowing her to spend more time with her young family. We look forward to having her valued advice at the Board level. All of our wonderful staff members and combined Board of Directors are thrilled with this opportunity and are already hard at work enhancing our combined events and programs with great enthusiasm.

To all our many donors, supporters, volunteers, patients, caregivers and event communities, we look forward to bettering the lives of patients and their families across Canada together!

Wishing you a happy and healthy summer from all of us at Colorectal Cancer Canada!

Click here to read the press release.

Meet the Team

Advocacy, Support and Awareness.

Barry D. Stein

President

1350 rue Sherbrooke West
Suite 300
Montréal, QC H3G 1J1
barrys@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (514) 875-7745 ext. 230
F: (514) 875-7746

Frank Pitman

Patient and Volunteer Support

1350 rue Sherbrooke West
Suite 300
Montréal, QC H3G 1J1
frankp@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (514) 875-7745 ext. 229
F: (514) 875-7746

Bunnie Schwartz

Co-Founder

5915 Leslie Street, Suite 204
Toronto, ON M2H 1J8
bunnies@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (416) 785.0449 ext. 223
F: (416) 785.0450

Terri Iceton

Administrative Assistant

5915 Leslie Street, Suite 204
Toronto, ON M2H 1J8
terrii@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (416) 785.0449
F: (416) 785.0450

Cathie Jackson

Director of Operations

1350 rue Sherbrooke West
Suite 300
Montréal, QC H3G 1J1
cathiej@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: (514) 875-7745 ext.224
F: (514) 875-7746

Filomena Servidio-Italiano

Director of Education and Clinical Information

2 Bloor Street West
Suite 700
Toronto, ONT M4W 3R1
filomenas@colorectalcancercanada.com
T: 1 (877) 50 COLON (26566) ext. 232
F: (514) 875-7746

Get in touch and we'll get back to you as soon as we can.  We look forward to hearing from you!

  • Email
  • Phone
    1-877-50COLON (26566)
  • Fax
    514-875-7746 / 416-785-0450
  • Address
    1350 Sherbrooke West
    Suite 300
    Montreal, Qc, H3G 1J1
    ---
    4576 Yonge Street, Suite 605
    North York, ON, M2N 6N4
Help spread the message that colorectal cancer is

PREVENTABLE, TREATABLE and BEATABLE!

Colorectal Cancer Canada is a national non-profit organization comprised of volunteers, members, and management led by a board of directors. An expert medical advisory board, made up of top healthcare professionals in the field of colorectal cancer, provides counsel to the CCC to ensure members are kept abreast of the latest medical advances in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. The mandate of Colorectal Cancer Canada is threefold: awareness, support, and advocacy.

Awareness

The CCC carries out a wide variety of awareness and education events throughout the year to increase the profile of colorectal cancer in Canada and educate the public. We participate in health forums and conferences, distribute educational material, hold free information sessions, and produce public service announcements for television, radio and print.

Learn more

Support

As a patient-based organization, we understand the needs of those diagnosed with colorectal cancer and their families. Compassion, knowledge and understanding are offered through support groups across the country, connecting patients, survivors, and caregivers.

Learn more

Advocacy

The CCC works to inform key decision-makers of the two biggest concerns for colorectal cancer prevention and care in Canada: nation-wide screening and patient access to effective medical treatments. The CCC interacts with politicians and officials through roundtable discussions , press conferences, and educational events to promote effective policy. As issues evolve, the CCC remains at the forefront making sure patients’ needs are heard.

Learn more

Prevention

Most colorectal cancer deaths could be avoided if everyone aged 50 years and older underwent regular screening tests.

Product / Service #1

Whatever your company is most known for should go right here, whether that's bratwurst or baseball caps or vampire bat removal.

Product / Service #2

What's another popular item you have for sale or trade? Talk about it here in glowing, memorable terms so site visitors have to have it.

Product / Service #3

Don't think of this product or service as your third favorite, think of it as the bronze medalist in an Olympic medals sweep of great products/services.

services-1

Talk more about your products here.

Tell prospective customers more about your company and the services you offer here.  Replace this image with one more fitting to your business.

Talk more about your products here.

Tell prospective customers more about your company and the services you offer here.  Replace this image with one more fitting to your business.

services-2

Next Steps...

This is should be a prospective customer's number one call to action, e.g., requesting a quote or perusing your product catalog.

Product / Service Categories

Project Name

Talk about this portfolio piece--who you did it for and why, plus what the results were (potential customers love to hear about real-world results). Discuss any unique facets of the project--was it accomplished under an impossible deadline?--and show how your business went above and beyond to make the impossible happen.

Product / Service Categories

Project Name

Talk about this portfolio piece--who you did it for and why, plus what the results were (potential customers love to hear about real-world results). Discuss any unique facets of the project--was it accomplished under an impossible deadline?--and show how your business went above and beyond to make the impossible happen.

This is where you should answer the most common questions prospective customers might have. It’s a good idea to cover things like your return policy, product warranty info, shipping and returns, etc. Check out the examples below.


What’s your return policy?

Return any of our products--no questions asked--within 30 days of purchase. We even pay return shipping.


Do you ship oversees and to P.O. boxes?

Yes, we’ll ship your package anywhere that can accept deliveries.


Do you have customer service?

Of course! Our friendly and knowledgeable customer services reps are available to answer your questions 24/7/365.